Information

USS Mobile (CL-63)


USS Mobile (CL-63)

The USS Mobile (CL-63) was a Cleveland class light cruiser that fought in the Pacific, supporting the fast carrier force during the island hoping campaign, including the invasions of the Gilberts, Marianas, Palau Islands, the Philippines and Okinawa. She received 11 battle stars for her service.

The Mobile was launched in May 1942 at Newport News, Virginia, and commissioned on 24 March 1943. She trained in Chesapeake Bay and in Casco Bay, before departed for the Pacific.

The Mobile reached Pearl Harbor on 23 July 1943. After a month of training she joined CruDiv 13, part of Task Force 15. Her combat debut was a raid on Marcus Island on 31 August 1943, supporting a carrier force. She performed a similar role during attacks on Tarawa in September and on Wake Island on 5/6 October. During the Wake raid the Mobile actually shelled Japanese positions on the island.

After these early raids the Mobile joined the Fifth Fleet. In November the Mobile helped support the landings at Cape Torokina, Bougainville. She then took part in the invasion of the Gilbert Islands, supporting the landings on Tarawa from 20-28 November.

On 1 December 1943 the Mobile became part of Task Force 50, the fast carrier force in the Pacific Fleet. She took part in a series of attacks on Kwajalein and Wotje in the Marshall Islands, before the task force returned to Pearl Harbor. Mobilecontinued east to San Diego, where she joined the escort group allocated to the Amphibious Forces, 5th Fleet.

In mid-January this force sailed west to take part in the invasion of the Marshalls. The Mobile took part in a bombardment of Wotje (as part of CruDiv 13), before returning to the main fleet to take part in the landing on Kwajalein. This involved a mix of fire support missions and carrier screening duties, mostly off the islands of Roi and Namur in the Kwajalein group.

On 12 February 1944 the Mobile joined Task Force 58, part of the fast carrier force. Her first mission with TF 58 was a devastating carrier raid on the important Japanese base at Truk, in the Caroline Islands, on 16-17 February. This was followed by attacks on Saipan, Tinian and Guam in the Marianas on 21-12 February. After this TG 58.1 became TG 36.1 (12 March). The renumbered group supported the US Marines as they invaded Emirau in the Admiralty Islands on 20 March 1944.

On 27 March the group reverted to TG 58.1. Between 29 March and 3 April they attacked the Palau Islands, Yap and Woleai. Next were the landings at Hollandia in western New Guinea in April, where the Mobile supported the attacks at Aitape, Humbolt Bay and Tanah Merah Bay. This was followed by another attack on Wake Island (21-22 April), a return to Truk and Satawan on 29-30 April and a strike against Ponape on 1 May.

In June 1944 the fast carrier force, with Mobile part of the covering force, took part in the invasion of the Mariana Islands. They reached the area on 11 June and launched air raids on Saipan, Tinian, Guam and Rota. From 11-17 June the group spread its activities across the Marianas, preventing the Japanese from reinforcing the garrison on Saipan.

The Mobile took part in the Battle of the Philippine Sea, acting as part of the carrier screen and providing antisubmarine and air-sea rescue cover.

The carrier force briefly left the Marianas in late June-early July to attack targets further afield. Pagan Island was the target on 24 June. Eniwetok was next, followed by the Bonin and Volcano Islands on 4 July. By 6 July the task force was back in the Marianas, where the Mobile screened the carriers while they attacked Guam and Rota.

On 23 July TG 58.1 set sail for the Western Carolines, where they attacked Yap, Ulithi and Fais (26 July). The Mobile was part of the inner protective ring, closest to the carriers, during this raid. The carrier force briefly visited Saipan on 2 August, before heading off for another raid on the Bonin and Volcano Islands. This time the cruisers, including the Mobile, were used to carry out an anti-shipping sweep around Chichi Jima. The Mobile took part in the sinking of a large cargo ship and a destroyer and bombarded Chichi Jima.

The Fifth Fleet was now redesignated the Third Fleet, and TG 58 became TG 38. The Mobile was now part of TG 38.3. The renamed group attacked the Palaus on 6-8 September, then hit the Philippines, striking at Mindanao on 9-10 September and the Visayas on 12-13 September.

On 15 September the group reached the Palaus, where it supported the invasions of Peleliu and Angaur. This was followed by another raid into the Philippines, this time against Manila (21 September) and a return to the Visayas on 24 September.

On 6 October the fleet raided the Ryukyu Islands. Mobile, with the destroyers Gatling (DD-671) and Cotton (DD-669) was detached to find two Japanese ships. One had been sunk by the time they arrived, but they were able to sink the second, a large cargo ship. After this detached duty the Mobile took part in strikes on Formosa and the Pescadores.

Early in October the cruisers Canberra (CA-70) and Houston (CL-81) were badly damaged (during a major attack on Formosa) and needed an escort as they escaped to safety. The Mobile was part of this force from 13-17 October, and the two damaged cruisers were successfully moved out of the danger area.

On 20 October the Mobile was part of the force that covered the invasion of Leyte. She was thus involved in the Battle of Leyte Gulf, fighting in the battle of Cape Engano (24-25 October 1944). She also took part in the pursuit of the Japanese Mobile Fleet as the survivors of that fleet attempted to escape north. The Japanese carrier Chiyoda was crippled, but she had to be sunk by a force made up of the cruisers Mobile, Sante Fe, New Orleans and Wichita and their supporting destroyers. The rest of the year was spent off the Philippines, supporting the invasion, before at the end of December she set sail for California and a refit.

The Mobile returned to action in the spring of 1945. She reached the fleet off Okinawa on 3 April 1945, two days after the invasion. She joined Task Force 51, part of the Amphibious Forces, Pacific Fleet. She remained with this force for two months, supporting the fighting on Okinawa, providing anti-aircraft cover, taking part in anti-submarine patrols and forming part of a special group given the task of looking out for Japanese suicide boats.

In late May the Mobile joined TG 95.7, Philippine training group, at Leyte. She remained part of that group until the end of the war. After the fighting was over she set sail for Japan, reaching Sagami Bay (outside Tokyo Bay) in time to take part in the official Japanese surrender. She was then used to ferry liberated POWs from Japan to Okinawa. In October she cruised in the Sasebo area. She then performed two 'Magic Carpet' runs, taking US personnel back to the United States.

The Mobile was decommissioned on 9 May 1947 and entered the Reserve Fleet at Bremerton. She remained with the reserve untiul 1 March 1959 when she was struck from the Naval Register. She was sold for scrap on 16 December 1959.

Displacement (standard)

11,744t

Displacement (loaded)

14,131t

Top Speed

32.5kts

Range

11,000nm at 15kts

Armour – belt

3-5in

- armour deck

2in

- bulkheads

5in

- barbettes

6in

- turrets

6.5in face
3in top
3in side
1.5in rear

- conning tower

5in
2.25in roof

Length

610ft 1in oa

Armaments

Twelve 6in/47 guns (four triple turrets)
Twelve 5in/38 guns (six double positions)
Twenty eight 40mm guns
Twenty one AA 20mm guns
Four aircraft

Crew complement

1,285

Builder

Newport News

Laid down

14 April 1941

Launched

15 May 1942

Commissioned

24 March 1943

Broken up

1960


U.S. Navy Commissions its 26th Littoral Combat Ship USS Mobile

During the ceremony, Mobile’s commanding officer, Cmdr. Christopher W. Wolff, reported the ship ready and Byrne gave the traditional order to “Man our ship and bring her to life!”

“The commissioning of the fleet’s newest warship is an awesome occasion and with it comes the equally awesome responsibility to prepare ourselves to go forward and conduct our nation’s business,”

Mobile will homeport in San Diego with sister ships USS Independence (LCS 2), USS Coronado (LCS 4), USS Jackson (LCS 6), USS Montgomery (LCS 8), USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10), USS Omaha (LCS 12), USS Manchester (LCS 14), USS Tulsa (LCS 16), USS Charleston (LCS 18), USS Cincinnati (LCS 20), USS Kansas City (LCS 22), and USS Oakland (LCS 24).

The Independence-class littoral combat ship (LCS) is the most recent step in the small surface combatant evolution. A high-speed, agile, shallow draft, focused-mission surface combatant, the LCS is designed to conduct surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare, and mine countermeasures missions in the littoral near-shore region, while also possessing the capability for deep-water operations. With its open-architecture design, the LCS can support modular weapons, sensor systems and a variety of manned and unmanned vehicles to capture and sustain littoral maritime supremacy.


Laststandonzombieisland

While The Big Easy gets all the attention when it comes to Mardi Gras, it should be pointed out that Mobile, Alabama, home to the Bienville-founded French colony around Fort Conde/Fort Louis going back to the 1700s, has vigorously celebrated the tradition for centuries. Rebooted with a new flavor in 1868 during Reconstruction by local legend Joe Cain, Mobile has its own style when it comes to its parades. They even drop a Moon Pie on New Year’s Eve.

With this year’s festivals canceled due to COVID, all the floats ran downtown along Royal and Water Street last Friday in honor of the commissioning of the fifth USS Mobile (LCS-26) over the weekend. The event, hosted at the State Port on Saturday, saw Gov. “Mawmaw Kay” Ivy and Coach (AKA U.S. Senator) Tommy Tuberville stop by to welcome the ship to the Navy.

The first USS Mobile was the captured Confederate blockade runner Tennessee, caught in New Orleans by Farragut in 1862 and recycled to serve in his West Gulf Blockading Squadron as a sidewheel gunboat.

The second USS Mobile was, again, a former enemy vessel, the former HAPAG liner SS Cleveland awarded to the U.S. as Great War reparations and used a troopship to bring Doughboys back from France, eventually returning to HAPAG service in 1926.

The third and most famous USS Mobile was the Cleveland-class light cruiser (CL-63), “Mow ’em down Mobile!” who earned 11 battle stars in the Pacific in WWII only to be exiled to mothballs for 12 years of purgatory in red lead before heading to the scrappers.

USS Mobile (CL-63) in San Francisco Bay, California, circa late 1945. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph. Catalog #: NH 77364

The fourth USS Mobile was a Charleston-class amphibious cargo ship (LKA-115), which spent lots of time off Vietnam in her 25-year Cold War career. Decommissioned in 1994, she was struck from the Navy List in 2015 and is still languishing at Philadelphia NISMF, pending disposal.

An Independence-class littoral combat ship, the current USS Mobile was built at Austal only a few hundred yards from where she was commissioned and will, hopefully, go on to help prove the class’s ultimate worth and not be decommissioned in a decade. USS Mobile will homeport at Naval Base San Diego, California, from where she may soon sail into tense West Pac waters.


USS Mobile (CL-63) - History

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USS Mobile (LKA-115)

USS Mobile (AKA-115/LKA-115) was a Charleston class attack cargo ship named after the city of Mobile, Alabama. She was the fourth U.S. Navy ship to bear that name. She served as a commissioned ship for 24 years and 4 months. LKA's had the distinction of being the only ships in the "Gator Navy" that were not flat bottom. They would drop anchor several hundred yards offshore and use their Mike 8's (LCM-8) and Mike 6's (LCM-6) to ferry in the Marines and their equipment.

The name was assigned on 6 November 1967, and the ship was laid down at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Newport News, VA, 15 January 1968 as AKA-115. As of the date of her article in DANFS, she was still under construction, and was scheduled to be completed in early spring 1969.

Mobile was extensively involved in the Vietnam War. In April 1975, Mobile participated in Operation Frequent Wind, the evacuation of Saigon, Vietnam. Ώ]

Mobile took part in WestPac 84 and was involved in numerous operations. In the Gulf War, she was part of an 18-ship amphibious task force that was the largest such force since the Korean War. The task force arrived on station in the North Arabian Sea on 12 January 1991. The ship was decommissioned on 4 February 1994 at Long Beach, CA. She is berthed at the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility in Philadelphia, PA.


USS Mobile (CL-63) - History

The U.S. Navy last weekend commissioned the USS Mobile (LCS 26), which was built at Austal USA’s world-class manufacturing operation in its namesake city.

The Independence-variant littoral combat ship becomes the 16th ship Austal has delivered to the Navy over the last five years. LCS 26 was delivered to the Navy in late 2020.

U.S. Senator Tommy Tuberville (R-AL) delivered the commissioning ceremony’s principal address, per a Navy release.

“The United States has been the greatest source of good in the history of the world and we will continue to be a force for good because of the brave men and women that we have here today,” remarked Tuberville — a staunch supporter of Austal who serves on the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Guest speakers for the event also included Governor Kay Ivey, Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson and James Geurts — performing the duties of the undersecretary of the Navy.

“The ships that this city has built are literally sailing on every ocean right now,” stated Geurts, referencing Mobile-based Austal USA.

The future Mobile was christened in December 2019 by its sponsor, Rebecca Byrne, the wife of then-Congressman Bradley Byrne (AL-01).

“We have the distinction of the USS Mobile being built and commissioned in its namesake city here in the historic port of Mobile,” she said. “We welcome the ship to the United States fleet that bears our great name and comes on great Navy tradition.”

The ceremony completed a weeklong series of events celebrating the ship and its namesake city. USS Mobile is the fifth ship named in honor of the port city on Alabama’s Gulf Coast.

At 419 feet in length, LCS 26 has a draft of only 14.4 feet and can reach a sprint speed of over 40 knots.

LCS 26 is capable of operating independently or in a group. This type of Alabama-built ship is designed to defeat growing littoral threats and provide access and dominance along coastal waters, yet also is capable of open-ocean operation. A fast, maneuverable and networked surface-combatant, Independence-variant littoral combat ships provide the required warfighting capabilities and operational flexibility to execute focused missions such as surface warfare, mine warfare and anti-submarine warfare.

LSC 26 is the first of its name to actually be built in Mobile.

The first USS Mobile was a side-wheel steamer that operated as a Confederate government-operated blockade runner. It was captured by U.S. forces at New Orleans in April 1862, commissioned as Tennessee and later renamed Mobile.

The second Mobile was reportedly a passenger liner operated by Hamburg Amerika Lines between Germany and the United States until the outbreak of World War I. It was taken over by the Allied Maritime Council and assigned to the United States after the Armistice and commissioned in March 1919.

The third Mobile (CL 63) was commissioned March 24, 1943. It participated in numerous campaigns in the Pacific during World War II and received 11 battle stars for her service by the time she was decommissioned in May of 1947.

The fourth Mobile (LKA 115) was an amphibious cargo ship that served from September 1969 until decommissioning in February of 1994.

LCS 26 will homeport in San Diego with sister ships: USS Independence (LCS 2), USS Coronado (LCS 4), USS Jackson (LCS 6), USS Montgomery (LCS 8), USS Gabrielle Giffords (LCS 10), USS Omaha (LCS 12), USS Manchester (LCS 14), USS Tulsa (LCS 16), USS Charleston (LCS 18), USS Cincinnati (LCS 20), USS Kansas City (LCS 22) and USS Oakland (LCS 24).

Sean Ross is the editor of Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @sean_yhn


USS Mobile (CL-63) - History

The Mobile Bay (CG 53) is the U.S. Navy's 9th Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser and was named for the naval Battle of Mobile Bay during the American Civil War in 1864. The keel was laid down by the Litton-Ingalls Shipbuilding Corporation at Pascagoula, Mississippi, on June 6, 1984 launched on August 22, 1985 and christened on October 12, 1985. Capt. Frank R. Whalen is the prospective commanding officer.

February 21, 1987 USS Mobile Bay was commissioned during a ceremony at the Alabama State Docks in Mobile, Ala.

March 8, The Mobile Bay arrived at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for a three-week Refresher Training (REFTRA) Port call to Port Everglades, Fla., from April 2-6 Ammo onload at Naval Weapons Station Charleston, S.C., from April 7-16.

April 17, USS Mobile Bay arrived in its homeport of Naval Station Mayport, Fla., for the first time Underway for shock trials on May 14 Inport Port Canaveral, Fla., from May 18- June 16.

June 26, The guided-missile cruiser arrived at Ingalls shipyard in Pascagoula, Miss., for a post shock availability Brief stop in Mayport to refuel on July 29 Inport Naval Station Norfolk, Va., from July 31- Aug. 3 Magnetic deperming at Lambert's Point, Va., from Aug. 3-5.

August 6, The Mobile Bay anchored off Annapolis, Md., for a four-day visit in conjunction with the annual Parents Weekend Ammo onload at NWS Charleston from Aug. 12-14 Returned home on Aug. 15.

September 8, CG 53 departed Mayport for a Combat Systems Ship's Qualification Trials (CSSQT) in the Underwater Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) range off Andros Island, Bahamas, and Atlantic Fleet Weapons Training Facility (AFWTF) range off Puerto Rico Inport Naval Station Roosevelt Roads, P.R., to refuel from Sept. 14-15 and Sept. 18-21.

September 25, USS Mobile Bay anchored off the coast of St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin islands, for a three-day visit Port calls to Roosevelt Roads (Sept. 29-30) and Nassau, Bahamas, (Oct. 2-6) Returned to homeport on Oct. 8 Underway for routine training from Oct. 26-30 and Nov. 18-19 Underway for a Dependent's Day Cruise on Nov. 19 Underway for final contract trials on Dec. 1.

January 15, 1988 USS Mobile Bay entered the Ingalls shipyard for a two-month Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) Returned to Mayport on March 17 Underway for REFTRA at Guantanamo Bay from April 17- May 17.

July 15, Capt. David S. Bill, III relieved Capt. Frank R. Whalen as CO of the Mobile Bay.

August 24, CG 53 departed Naval Station Mayport to participate in NATO exercise Teamwork Port visit to Kristiansend, Norway, from Sept. 25-29 Returned home on Oct. 12 after a two-day delay due to storm evasion underway for FLEETEX 2-89 from Nov. 4-23 Port call to Roosevelt Roads from Nov. 15-19 Underway for Operational Propulsion Plant Examination (OPPE) from Dec. 7-9.

From February 8-27, 1989, the Mobile Bay was underway for the seconds phase of Fleet Exercise (FLEETEX).

May 11, 1989 USS Mobile Bay, with an embarked Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 44 Det. 7, departed Naval Station Mayport for its maiden deployment as part of the USS America (CV 66) Battle Group.

May 24, The Mobile Bay arrived in Malaga, Spain, for a five-day port visit.

June 3, The guided-missile cruiser anchored off the coast of Benidorm, Spain, for a six-day port call Participated in exercise National Week from June 9-14 Inport Haifa, Israel, from June 19-23 Transited Suez Canal on June 24 Operated in the Gulf of Oman through July 9.

July 18, USS Mobile Bay arrived in Diego Garcia for a three-day upkeep after participating in Weapons Week exercises.

July 27, CG 53 anchored off the coast of Phuket, Thailand, for a five-day port visit Arrived in North Arabian Sea on Aug. 8 Port call to Muscat, Oman, from Aug. 14-17 Returned to Mediterranean on Sept. 5.

September 6, The Mobile Bay supported the evacuation of U.S. Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon Port visit to Palma de Mallorca, Spain, from Sept. 9-12 Inport Naval Station Newport , R.I., from Sept. 22-25 to embark PBE members for OPPE.

September 29, USS Mobile Bay returned to homeport after four-and-a-half month deployment in the U.S. 5th, 6th and 7th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR).

November 12, USS Mobile Bay arrived in Houston, Texas, for a six-day port visit in conjunction with the 75th Anniversary of the Port of Houston Returned home on Nov. 22.

December 2, The guided-missile cruiser pulled into Bridgetown, Barbados, for a three-day port visit Conducted Naval Gunfire Support (NGFS) qualifications off Vieques Island, Puerto Rico, from Dec. 6-8 Participated in Anti Submarine Warfare Exercise (ASWEX) ar St. Croix acoustic range from Dec. 9-12 Returned home on Dec. 15.

May 25, 1990 Capt. Stephen R. Woodall relieved Capt. David S. Bill, III as commanding officer of CG 53.

In June, USS Mobile Bay shifted homeports from Mayport, Florida, to Yokosuka, Japan.

August ?, USS Mobile Bay departed Naval Base Yokosuka for a surge Middle East deployment.

In early January 1991, the Mobile Bay moored alongside USS Acadia (AD 42), anchored off Masirah, Oman, for a four-day upkeep Entered the Arabian Gulf on Jan. 11.

From January 18-20, USS Mobile Bay launched 22 Tomahawk Land Attack Missiles (TLAMs), from the station in the NAG, in support of Operation Desert Storm.

From Jan. 21 through March 11, CG 53 acted as Anti-Surface Warfare Air Control Unit in the North Arabian Gulf, detecting and destroying 38 Iraq's naval vessels.

On Feb. 14, the Mobile Bay assumed duties as Battle Force Anti-Air Warfare Commander and on Feb. 15 become the first ship to control a four-carrier Task Force.

April 15, USS Mobile Bay returned to homeport after an eight-month combat deployment in support of Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm.

June 21, The Mobile Bay arrived in the vicinity of Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines, to participate in Operation Fiery Vigil, the evacuation of thousands of people displaced by the volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo Returned home on July 1 In August, the cruiser arrived in Guam to offload ammunition.

September 1, USS Mobile Bay entered the dry-dock at Yokosuka Naval Shipyard for a two-month Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) Underway on Dec. 6 Brief stop in Subic Bay for ammo onload on Dec. 12 before conducting operations with the USS Independence (CV 62) BG off the coast of Okinawa Returned to Yokosuka on Dec. 20.

February 10, 1992 The guided-missile cruiser departed Naval Base Yokosuka in support of carrier qualifications for USS Independence. In mid-March, the Batthe Group arrived in Subic Bay, Philippines, to assist in the transfer of materials before the closure of U.S. Naval Station Subic Bay and Naval Air Station Cubi Point.

April 15, USS Mobile Bay departed homeport for a scheduled Arabian Gulf deployment as part of the Independence BG.

May 1, The Mobile Bay arrived in Sydney, Australia, for a four-day port visit in conjunction with the 50th Anniversary celebration of the Battle of Coral Sea. Sailing through the Straits of Hormuz in late May, the ship began duties as the Arabian Gulf Anti-Air Warfare Commander. CG 53 also played a vital role in Operation Southern Watch, the enforcement of the U.N.-mandated "No Fly Zone" over southern Iraq.

July 6, USS Mobile Bay pulled into Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, for its first port visit after two-month at sea.

July 8, Capt. Steven G. Smith relieved Capt. Stephen R. Woodall as CO of the Mobile Bay during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship in Abu Dhabi.

July 27, The guided-missile cruiser arrived in Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for an eight-day upkeep with USS Acadia (AD 42).

In August, USS Mobile Bay visited Ad Damnan, Saudi Arabia, and returned to Jebel Ali for another week-long availability, this time with USS Dixon (AS 37).

In late September, CG 53 anchored off Phuket, Thailand, for a four-day port visit Port call to Hong Kong from Oct. 8-11 to embark "Tigers."

October 13, USS Mobile Bay returned to Yokosuka, Japan, after a six-month deployment.

In early November, the Mobile Bay departed for ANNUALEX '92, a major naval exercise involving units of the U.S. Navy and the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force Underway again in December for MISSILEX off Okinawa.

January 15, 1993 USS Mobile Bay arrived in Nagasaki, Japan, for a scheduled port visit.

From March 31- April 2, CG 53 was underway for sea trials after a two-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

May 10, USS Mobile Bay departed Yokosuka to participate in a multi-national exercise Spring Training '93, as part of the USS Independence Battle Group, with the Royal Australian and Singaporean Navies off western Australia Port visit to Perth in late May.

June 12, The guided-missile cruiser pulled into Darwin, Australia, for a scheduled port visit Returned home on July 1 Completed INSURV on July 23.

September 21, The Mobile Bay departed Vladivostok, Russia, after a goodwill port visit Participated in ANNUALEX '93 before returning to Yokosuka on Oct. 15.

November 17, USS Mobile Bay, with an embarked Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light (HSL) 51 Det. 1, departed homeport for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

December 1, USS Mobile Bay pulled into Singapore for a four-day port call Port visit to Karachi, Pakistan, from Dec. 16-19.

December 21, The Mobile Bay entered the Arabian Gulf and immediately assumed duties as Battle force ZULU Anti-Air Warfare Commander ("ZW"), Strike Patrol Platform and Joint Link-11 Coordinator for all alied naval forces Port visits to Dubai, U.A.E., from Dec. 22-28 and Jan. 7-12, 1994.

January 26, CG 53 moored alongside USS Acadia in Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a nine-day port call to get tender support services Brief stop in Bahrain before departing Arabian Gulf on Feb. 14.

February 22, The guided-missile cruiser arrived at British naval base Sembawang in Singapore for a week-long port call to conduct repairs after experiencing the serious problem with the 60 Hz distribution system Port visit to Hong Kong from March 7-12.

March 17, USS Mobile Bay returned to Yokosuka after a four-month underway period.

April 23, The Mobile Bay underway to participate in MISSILEX 94-2 off Okinawa Port call to Pusan, ROK, from May 5-9 Returned home on May 11 In dry-dock from May 14-28 to replace the section of steel on the hull.

May 31, USS Mobile Bay departed Naval Base Yokosuka to participate in a month-long exercise RIMPAC in the mid-Pacific involving over 50 warships from five Pacific Rim nations.

June 18, CG 53 pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a four-day port call Returned home on July 5.

August 17, Capt. Garry Holmstrom relieved Capt. Steven G. Smith as the 5th CO of Mobile Bay.

From Aug. 20-26, the Mobile Bay was underway for routine training in the Okinawa Op. Area Underway again on Sept. 12, Port call to Hong Kong from Sept. 17-21 Returned home on Sept. 26.

October 18, USS Mobile Bay anchored off the coast of Leyte Island, Philippines, near Tacloban City, to support the commemorative ceremonies for the 50th Anniversary of the General McArthur's landing at Leyte Gulf.

October 22, The guided-missile cruiser anchored in Manila Harbor for a five-day visit to Republic of the Philippines Port visit to Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, from Oct. 29- Nov. 1.

November 5, The Mobile Bay anchored off Penang, Malaysia, for a five-day port visit Port call to Singapore from Nov. 11-15 Returned home on Nov. 22 Underway for Group Sail operations with the USS Constellation (CV 64) BG from Dec. 6-14 Commenced a three-month SRA on Dec. 15 Tender availability with USS Holland (AS 32) from Feb. 8-23.

From March 21-24, 1995, USS Mobile Bay was underway for sea trials and ammo onload Departed for MISSILEX on April 11 Inport White Beach Naval Facility, Okinawa, from April 13-14 Conducted Naval Gunfire Support off Okino Daito on April 14 Port call to Hong Kong from April 23-28.

May 11, CG 53 anchored off the coast of Pattaya, Thailand, for a five-day visit after conducting routine training with the Independence Battle Group, in the Gulf of Thailand Returned home on June 2 Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on July 7.

August 4, USS Mobile Bay departed Yokosuka for a scheduled Arabian Gulf deployment in support of operation Southern Watch, with the combined detachments of an embarked SH-60B from HSL-51 and SH-60F from HS-14.

August 16, The Mobile Bay anchored off Jakarta, Indonesia, in a formation of over 80 ships from 24 nations, for a six-day port visit, to participate in celebration of 50 years of Indonesian Independence Port call to Singapore from Aug. 24-28.

September 10, The guided-missile cruiser pulled into Abu Dhabi, U.A.E., for voyage repairs. Due to port loading, the ship shifted ports to Dubai on Sept. 13 for three more days.

September 27, USS Mobile Bay arrived again in Dubai, U.A.E., for a week-long port visit.

On October 14, the Mobile Bay conducted turnover with USS Vicksburg (CG 69) and transited Straits of Hormuz on Oct. 15 The ship was ordered to return back to Gulf, along with USS Fife (DD 991), on Oct. 16 Anchored off the coast of Manama, Bahrain, from Oct. 18-20 Port calls to Dubai from Oct. 29- Nov. 4 and Nov. 11-14.

November 21, CG 53 anchored off the coast of Patong Beach for a four-day visit to Phuket, Thailand Port call to Singapore from Nov. 27-30.

December 7, USS Mobile Bay returned to Naval Base Yokosuka after a four-month deployment.

January 8, 1996 The Mobile Bay entered the Dry Dock #6 ant Yokosuka Naval Shipyard for an Extended Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (E-DSRA) Departed dry-dock on May 21 Underway for ammo onload on Aug. 7 Underway for sea trials from Aug. 12-15 Underway for routine training from Aug. 26-29 Friends and Family Day Cruise in Tokyo Wan on Aug. 30.

September 9, USS Mobile Bay departed homeport for a western Pacific patrol as part of the USS Independence Battle Group Inport Subic Bay, Philippines, from Sept. 20-24 Port visit to Hong Kong from Sept. 27-30 Returned home on Oct. 4 Underway for exercises Foal Eagle/Keen Sword and ANNUALEX on Oct. 16.

November 9, The Mobile Bay relieved USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) as the primary Anti-Air Warfare Commander for the Independence (CV 62) BG Returned to Yokosuka on Nov. 12 to avoid the Super Typhoon Violet.

November 20, Capt. Joseph M. Volpe, Jr., relieved Capt. Garry Holmstrom as CO of CG 53 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

From Dec. 2-13, the Mobile Bay was underway for MISSILEX 97-1 off Okinawa Inport Naval Base Sasebo, Japan, from Dec. 4-7.

From January 24-31, 1997, USS Mobile Bay was underway in support of carrier qualifications for USS Independence.

February 14, USS Mobile Bay departed Yokosuka, Japan, for a four-month "Southern Swing" patrol Participated in ASWEX 97-2JA through Feb. 26 Inport Apra Harbor, Guam, from Feb. 26-28 Participated in MISSILEX off Farallon de Medinilla Island, approximately 45 n.m. northeast from Saipan, from March 1-2.

March 26, The Mobile Bay moored at Garden Island Naval Facility in Sydney, Australia, for a week-long port visit after participating in exercise Tandem Thrust, at the Great Barrier Reef, from March 10-24.

April 11, The guided-missile cruiser pulled again into Apra Harbor for an 18-day port call for maintanance availability and Engineering Certification Preps Port visit to Hong Kong from May 27-30 Brief stop in White Beach, Okinawa, from June 2-3 Port call to Sasebo, Japan, from June 4-7.

June 10, USS Mobile Bay returned to homeport after a four-month underway period.

July 1, The Mobile Bay arrived in Vladivostok, Russia, for a four-day port visit Underway for routine training from Aug. 22-28 Brief stop to Okinawa from Aug. 25-26.

September 5, CG 53 arrived in Otaru, Japan, for a four-day port visit. Returned to Yokosuka on Sept. 26 after participating in ASWEX 97-6JA and exercise Valiant Blitz off Okinawa.

From October 14 through Nov. 14, the Mobile Bay was underway for exercises Foal Eagle '97, ANNUALEX 09G and Cope North 98-1 Port call to Busan, ROK, from Oct. 18-21.

January 7, 1998 USS Mobile Bay departed Yokosuka in support of U.S. Secretary of Defense visit to Singapore Inport Sembawang naval base from Jan. 13-19 Port call to Hong Kong from Jan. 22-27 Brief stop in Okinawa from Jan. 29-30 Inport Apra Harbor, Guam, from Feb. 5-9 Returned home on Feb. 12 Underway for sea trials after a two-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) from May 6-7 Underway for for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on May 25.

June 1, USS Mobile Bay departed Yokosuka for a Summer Patrol in support of CARAT exercise Inport Guam from June 5-6.

June 11, The Mobile Bay arrived in Townsville, Australia, for a four-day port visit Port call to Darwin from June 18-23.

June 28, The guided-missile cruiser pulled into Lumut, Malaysia, for a three-day port call before participating in at-sea phase of Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) exercise.

July 6, USS Mobile Bay anchored off the coast of Sattahip for a week-long in-port phase of CARAT Thailand Port call to Singapore from July 20-27 for third CARAT exercise Inport Singapore again from July 30- Aug. 2 Port call to White Beach Naval Facility, Okinawa, from Aug. 7-9.

August 10, CG 53 anchored off Nagoja, Japan, for a four-day port visit Returned home on Aug. 15 Underway for Type Training in the Philippine Sea from Sept. 22-23.

September 25, Capt. Edward J. Rogers, III relieved Capt. Joseph M. Volpe, Jr., as commanding officer of the Mobile Bay.

October 12, USS Mobile Bay pulled into Busan, Republic of Korea, for a four-day port visit for Fleet Week celebration Emergency sortied to avoid Typhoon Zeb on Oct. 15 Anchored off Inchon, ROK, from Oct. 22-26 before participating in exercises Foal Eagle '98 and ANNUALEX 10G Returned home on Nov. 13 Underway for MISSILEX from Dec. 1-11 Inport Okinawa from Dec. 3-6.

January 15, 1999 The Mobile Bay departed Naval Base Yokosuka for NSFS qualifications and MISSILEX off Okinawa Port call to Hong Kong from Jan. 28- Feb. 1 Returned home on Feb. 5 Underway for ECERT from Feb. 25-26.

March 15, USS Mobile Bay departed homeport for a Spring Patrol as part of the USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63) BG Brief stop in Guam before participating in exercise Tundem Thrust '99 Ordered to return to Yokosuka on April 15 for a ten-day upkeep Underway again on April 26.

In early May, the Mobile Bay visited Singapore to participate in the 1999 International Maritime Defense Exhibition (IMDEX) Asia After a port visit to Pattaya Beach, Mobile Bay participated in Cobra Gold exercise, in the Gulf of Thailand, from May 18-23 Brief stop in Okinawa before returned to Yokosuka on June 5.

June 17, USS Mobile Bay underway again, within 25 hours of notification, to calm a fishing area dispute in North Korean fishing waters Brief stop in Sasebo before a four-day visit to Busan, ROK Returned home on July 2.

On August 23, the Mobile Bay deployed in support of exercise Crocodilo '99, off the coast of Dili, East Timor. After a four-day operations with USS O'Brien (DD 975) and HMAS Anzac (FFH 150) she was ordered to proced to Darwin, Australia, to prepare for Operation Stabilise.

After a fou-week underway off East Timor, USS Mobile Bay was detached as Commander, INTERFET Forces and visited ports of Singapore and Pattaya, Thailand Arrived in Kagoshima, Japan, in late October for a goodwill visit before participating in ANNUALEX 11G Returned to homeport on Nov. 9.

In July 2000, USS Mobile Bay changed its homeport from Naval Base Yokosuka, Japan, to Naval Station San Diego, Calif.

May 25, 2001 CG 53 completed a seven-month Extended Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (E-DSRA) at NASSCO shipyard in San Diego Arrived at Naval Surface Warfare Center in Port Hueneme, Calif., in late August for a three-week extensive combat and weapons systems groom, followed by a CSSQT and a Joint Theater Ballistic Missile tracking exercise.

September 11, The Mobile Bay was ordered to proceed off the coast of San Francisco, Calif., to provide air coverage.

December 21, U.S. Coast Guard Law Enforcement Detachment (CGLED), operating from the Mobile Bay, seized 10.5 metric tons of cocaine approximately 800 miles southwest of Acapulco, Mexico. The guided-missile cruiser departed on Dec. 14 in support of Operation Caper Focus.

From January 18 through February 7, 2002, the Mobile Bay participated in COMPTUEX Underway for Engineering Underway Demonstration from April 4-5.

April 10, Capt. W. James Kear relieved Capt. Edward J. Rogers, III as CO of the USS Mobile Bay during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Station San Diego's Pier 2.

April 19, The guided-missile cruiser underway for ammuniton onload at Naval Weapons Station Seal Beach, Calif., before participating in a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) Completed the Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment on June 14 Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on July 18.

July 24, USS Mobile Bay departed homeport for a scheduled deployment, as part of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) Battle Group, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom Brief stop in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Aug. 1 Before entering the U.S. 5th Fleet AoR, the ship visited Guam, Singapore and Thailand.

September 6, While flying in support of Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO) one of Mobile Bay's SH-60 helicopters crashed in the Arabian Gulf. A civilian television cameraman was killed and four U.S. Navy sailors were injured. The cameraman, from KCBS-TV Los Angeles, was filming a news story on the U.S. Navy. The helicopter had been hovering over a Syrian-flagged vessel to observe a maritime health inspection boarding when its rotor blades hit the ship's mast.

March 22, 2003 USS Mobile Bay launched its first Tomahawk Land Attack Missiles (TLAMs) in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

April 25, USS Mobile Bay returned to San Diego after a record nine-month combat deployment. She is the first ship to be a part of Optimal Manning, a directive that was introduced by the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO), where the crew was reduced by 17 percent.

September 4, Rear Adm. Jacob L. Shuford, Commander, Cruiser Destroyer Group (CCDG) 3, relieved of command Capt. Kear due to a "loss of confidence in his ability to command." The XO Lt. Cmdr. Joseph P. Naman assumed temporary command of the Mobile Bay.

September 16, Capt. Neal J. Kusumoto relieved Lt. Cmdr. Joseph P. Naman as CO of CG 53.

October 11, CG 53 recently arrived in San Francisco, Calif., for the 22nd Fleet Week celebration.

March 18, 2004 Capt. Kusumoto was relieved as CO of USS Mobile Bay due to "personal behaviour." He was arrested on Feb. 12 on a misdemeanor drunken-driving charge. The XO Lt. Cmdr. Joseph P. Naman assumed temporary command of the ship.

March 28, Capt. Daniel P. Keller relieved Lt. Cmdr. Joseph P. Naman as commanding officer of the Mobile Bay.

June 17, USS Mobile Bay, along with USS Preble (DG 88), departed Naval Base San Diego for a surge deployment to the western Pacific and Central Command Areas of Responsibility (AoR) in support of the Global War on Terrorism. The ships will join up with the USS Belleau Wood (LHA 3) Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) that departed San Diego on May 27.

December 17, USS Mobile Bay returned to San Diego after a six-month deployment in support of Maritime Security Operations (MSO) and Operation Iraqi Freedom. The ship spent most times in the North Arabian Gulf providing security for Al Basra and the Khawr Al Amaya oil terminals.

October 8, 2005 The Mobile Bay recently pulled into San Francisco to participate in annual Fleet Week celebration.

March 3, 2006 USS Mobile Bay departed San Diego for a scheduled deployment, with the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, in support of the Global War On Terrorism and Maritime Security Operations (MSO).

From March 24-31, USS Mobile Bay participated in annual combined and joint exercise Foal Eagle, that involved more than 70 U.S. and ROK Navy ships and more than 100 aircraft from all services of both the U.S. and ROK armed forces.

April 10, The guided-missile cruiser participated in flight operations with the Hong Kong Governmental Flight Service in the western Pacific Ocean. The HKGFS consists of helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, and its primary mission is to provide emergency airlift and search and rescue in local and coastal waters of Hong Kong.

From June 19-23, the Mobile Bay participated in exercise Valiant Shield '06, off the coast of Guam.

July 5, The Mobile Bay departed Pearl Harbor to participate in exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2006. Eight nations are participating in RIMPAC 2006, the world's largest biennial maritime exercise.

August 4, USS Mobile Bay returned to Naval Base San Diego after a five-month deployment to the western Pacific.

October 26, USS Mobile Bay is currently underway for "Leaders to Sea" program.

June 7, 2007 The Mobile Bay, commanded by Capt. Thomas Carney, moored outboard the USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) in Portland, Ore., for a three-day port visit to participate in the Fleet Week festivities during the 100th annual Portland Rose Festival.

November 12, The guided-missile cruiser is currently underway off the coast of southern California, participating in a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), as part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group.

January 23, 2008 CG 53 is currently participating in a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) in the SOCAL Op. Area.

March 17, USS Mobile Bay departed homeport for a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR Returned to San Diego on Oct. 8.

February 3, 2009 USS Mobile Bay, commanded by Capt. Denny Wetherlad, is currently underway for Group Sail operations as part of the Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9.

April 19, 2010 The guided-missile cruiser completed its 10-month shipyard modernization availability at BAE Systems San Diego Ship Repair facility.

July 17, USS Mobile Bay anchored in Monterey Harbor, California, to support the Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation (SMART) Scholarship for Service Program established by the Department of Defense (DoD) and administered by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Naval Postgraduate School. Returned to Naval Base San Diego on July 18.

February 4, 2011 CG 53 departed homeport for local operations as part of the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) CSG Completed Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) on May 27.

May 28, Capt. Thomas G. Halvorson relieved Capt. James J. Housinger as CO of the Mobile Bay during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Base San Diego.

July 29, USS Mobile Bay departed San Diego for a scheduled deployment, as part of the Stennis CSG, in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR.

September 4, The Mobile Bay pulled into Port Klang, Malaysia, for a four-day visit to Kuala Lumpur.

January 26, 2012 The guided-missile cruiser pulled into Changi Naval Base for a scheduled port visit to Singapore.

February 27, USS Mobile Bay returned to homeport after a seven-month deployment.

September 1, USS Mobile Bay departed Naval Base San Diego for a surge deployment as part of the USS John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group.

September 30, CG 53 moored at Sepanggar Naval Base for a four-day port visit to Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia.

October 7, The Mobile Bay anchored off the coast of Phuket, Thailand, for a three-day port visit.

November 24, USS Mobile Bay departed Kingdom of Bahrain after a four-day port call Another routine visit to Bahrain on Dec. 8.

February 1, 2013 The guided-missile cruiser pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a four-day visit to Dubai.

March 8, Capt. Timothy J. Kott relieved Capt. Thomas G. Halvorson as CO of the Mobile Bay during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship at Arabian Sea.

March 13, The Mobile Bay pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day port call.

April 1, CG 53 moored at Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a three-day port visit Inport Pearl Harbor from April 21-24.

April 29, USS Mobile Bay returned to San Diego after an eight-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet Areas of Responsibility.

October 7, The Mobile Bay departed Naval Base San Diego to participate in a Task Group Exercise (TGEX), with the U.S. and Canadian Navy ships, from Oct. 7-11.

November 1?, USS Mobile Bay moored at BAE Systems San Diego Ship Repair for a six-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

August 22, 2014 The guided-missile cruiser returned to homeport after underway for local operations.

January 30, 2015 USS Mobile Bay returned to Naval Base San Diego after a brief underway off the coast of southern California.

February 23, The Mobile Bay moored at Bravo Pier, Naval Air Station North Island for a brief stop to onload ammunition before underway for local operations.

March 3, Capt. Sean G. McLaren relieved Capt. Timothy J. Kott as the 17th CO of Mobile Bay during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship at Pier 3, Naval Base San Diego.

March 30, USS Mobile Bay departed homeport for a four-day underway for Group Sail operations.

April 11, CG 53 moored at Berth 2, Pier 7 on Naval Base San Diego after a brief underway in the SOCAL Op. Area Underway again on April 13.

April 13, USS Mobile Bay moored at Wharf 4 in Port Hueneme, Calif., for an 11-day combat systems groom with the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Underway for Group Sail and in support of Independent Deployer Certification Exercise (IDCERTEX), as part of the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) CSG, from April 25- May 3 Moored at Berth 2, Pier 3 on May 4 Underway for carrier escort duties from June 15-18 Underway again on June 22.

June 26, The Mobile Bay departed Naval Weapons Station Seal Beach, Calif., after ammo onload Returned home on June 29 Underway for INSURV Preps. on July 8 Underway for a Board of Inspection and Survey assessment on July 13 Underway for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) from July 28- Aug. 27.

December 7, USS Mobile Bay departed Berth 2, Pier 3 for routine training following a three-month Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV).

January 19, 2016 USS Mobile Bay departed San Diego for a scheduled deployment, as part of the USS John C. Stennis CSG-3.

February 14, The guided-missile cruiser moored at Berth 2, Tango Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a three-day port visit.

March 13, USS Mobile Bay moored at Newport Terminal in Mokpo, Republic of Korea, for a five-day port visit before participating in annual joint exercise Foal Eagle.

April 19, The Mobile Bay moored at Berth 2, Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a five-day liberty port visit.

May 21, USS Mobile Bay moored at Berth 3, Pier 15 in Manila South Harbor, Republic of the Philippines, for a week-long port visit.

June 9, CG 53 moored at Tategami Pier 2E in Fleet Activities Sasebo, Japan, for a five-day port visit before participating in at-sea phase of a trilateral exercise Malabar 2016.

June 28, USS Mobile Bay moored at Wharf B25 on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, for a two-week port visit to participate in a biennial multinational exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) Underway for at-sea phase on July 12 Moored outboard the USS Princeton (CG 59) at Wharf B25 from Aug. 2-4.

August 11, USS Mobile Bay moored at Berth 5, Pier 10 on Naval Base San Diego following a seven-month deployment to the U.S. 3rd and 7th Fleet AoR.

September 30, The Mobile Bay moored at Berth 2, Pier 2 on Naval Base San Diego after underway for local operations Underway again on Oct. 5 Anchored in San Francisco Bay for a brief stop before participating in Parade of Ships on Oct. 7.

October 7, USS Mobile Bay moored at Pier 35 South in San Francisco, Calif., for a four-day port visit to participate in the annual Fleet Week celebration.

October 13, The guided-missile cruiser moored at Berth 5, Pier 10 on Naval Base San Diego.

October 20, Capt. James L. Storm relieved Capt. Sean G. McLaren as CO of the USS Mobile Bay during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship at Pier 10.

November 4, USS Mobile Bay returned to homeport after a four-day underway off the coast of southern California Underway for ammo offload at the NWS Seal Beach on Nov. 16 Moored at Berth 5, Pier 3 on Nov. 21.

January 24, 2017 The Mobile Bay moved "dead-stick" from Naval Base San Diego to Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) Continental Maritime of San Diego shipyard for a Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) Moved to Berth 6, Pier 12 on July 10.

August 14, USS Mobile Bay moored at Bravo Pier, NAS North Island for a brief stop to onload ammunition before underway for sea trials Returned home on Aug. 18 Underway again on Sept. 25 Moored at Wharf 311 on NWS Seal Beach for ammo onload from Sept. 29-30.

October 2, The Mobile Bay moored at Berth 6, Pier 12 on Naval Base San Diego Brief underway for San Diego Fleet Week Sea and Air Parade on Oct. 14 Underway for Combat Systems Ship's Qualification Trials (CSSQT), at the Point Mugu Test Range, on Oct. 16.

October 26, USS Mobile Bay moored at Wharf 311 on NWS Seal Beach for a one-day ammo onload Moored at Berth 2, Pier 3 on Oct. 27 Underway for routine training from Nov. 6-9 and Nov. 13-17.

December 1, CG 53 moored at Berth 2, Pier 8 on Naval Base San Diego after a four-day underway off the coast of southern California Underway again on Dec. 6 Moored at Berth 6, Pier 3 on Dec. 8.

February 6, 2018 USS Mobile Bay departed homeport for a four-day underway in the SOCAL Op. Area Underway again on Feb. 20 Moored at Wharf 4 in Port Hueneme, Calif., for combat systems groom from Feb. 23- March 2 Moored at Berth 2, Pier 3 on March 5 Underway for routine training from March 26-30 Underway again on April 2.

April 2, The Mobile Bay moored at Wharf 311 on NWS Seal Beach for a four-day ammo onload Returned home on April 6.

April 30, USS Mobile Bay moored at Berth 1, Pier 7 on Naval Base San Diego after a two-week underway for Surface Warfare Advanced Tactical Training (SWATT) exercise, as part of the USS John C. Stennis CSG.

May 11, The Mobile Bay moored at Berth 2, Pier 10 on Naval Base San Diego after a 10-day underway for Group Sail Underway again from June 12-13 Day-long underway for INSURV assessment on June 20.

June 26, USS Mobile Bay recently departed homeport for routine training in the SOCAL Op. Area Moored at Bravo Pier for a brief stop to onload ammo on June 27 Returned home on June 29 Underway again on July 26 Moored at Berth 1, Pier 10 on July 27.

August 1, The Mobile Bay recently departed Naval Base San Diego for a Missile Exercise (MISSILEX) at the Point Mugu Test Range Commenced COMPTUEX/JTFEX on Aug. 7 Moored at Wharf 311, NWS Seal Beach for ammo onload from Sept. 10-14 Moored at Berth 1, Pier 3 on Sept. 14.

October 2?, USS Mobile Bay departed San Diego for a scheduled deployment.

November 16, The Mobile Bay participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76), USS Chancellorsville (CG 62), USS Stockdale (DDG 106) and USS Spruance (DDG 111), as a "show of force" in the Philippine Sea.

November 24, USS Mobile Bay moored at Berth 6, RSS Singapura for a four-day liberty port visit to Singapore Transited the Malacca Strait northbound from Nov. 28-29.

December 14, The Mobile Bay participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS John C. Stennis, USS Essex (LHD 2) and USS Decatur (DDG 73), as a "show of force" in the Gulf of Oman Transited the Strait of Hormuz northbound on Dec. 21.

December 22, Capt. Robert T. Bryans, Jr., relieved Capt. James L. Storm as CO of the CG 53, during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship, while underway in the Arabian Gulf.

December 24, USS Mobile Bay moored at Berth 5, Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP) in Hidd, Bahrain, for a six-day liberty visit to Manama to celebrate the Christmas Day.

January 20, 2019 The guided-missile cruiser transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound Transited the Lombok Strait northbound on Feb. 4 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Guadalupe (T-AO 200), in the Gulf of Thailand, on Feb. 9 Inport Laem Chabang, Thailand, from Feb. 10-14.

February 24, USS Mobile Bay conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Walter S. Diehl (T-AO 193), while underway in the South China Sea in support of national tasking Transited the Strait of Singapore westbound on March 5 Transited Strait of Hormuz northbound on March 22.

March 23, The Mobile Bay moored at Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a six-day liberty visit to Dubai Transited Strait of Hormuz southbound on April 7 Transited the Suez Canal northbound on April 20.

April 24, USS Mobile Bay participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS John C. Stennis, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55), USS Bainbridge (DDG 96), HMS Duncan (D37), SPS Mendez Nunez (F 104), FS Languedoc (D653) and USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8), while underway off the coast of Tripoli, Libya.

April 27, USS Mobile Bay moored at Berth 3, Mole H in Port of Marseille, France, for a four-day liberty visit Transited the Strait of Gibraltar westbound on May 3.

May 20, CG 53 anchored off the coast of Colon, Panama, for a brief stop Completed the southbound transit of Panama Canal, just after midnight, on May 21.

May 28, USS Mobile Bay moored at Berth 1, Pier 10 on Naval Base San Diego following a seven-month around-the-world deployment.

July 24, The Mobile Bay recently departed homeport en route to Seattle, Wash., to participate in annual Seafair Fleet Week celebration Moored at Berth 1, Alpha Pier on Naval Station Everett from July 27-29 Moored outboard the USS Spruance (DDG 111) at Bell Street Cruise Terminal in downtown Seattle from July 29- Aug. 2.

August 2, USS Mobile Bay moored at Pier 1C on Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Esquimalt, B.C., for a four-day port call Returned home on Aug. 9 Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Aug. 13.

September 13, The Mobile Bay moored at Berth 1, Pier 10 on Naval Base San Diego after a four-day underway in the SOCAL Op. Area Underway again from Sept. 23-24.

November 6, BAE Systems San Diego Ship Repair was awarded a $33,9 million delivery order N55236-20-F-4001 from multiple-award contract (N00024-16-D-4416) for the USS Mobile Bay's Selected Restricted Availability (SRA). Work is expected to be completed by October 2020.

January 12, 2020 USS Mobile Bay departed homeport to offload ammo at the Naval Weapons Station Seal Beach Moored at Wharf 311 from Jan. 13-17 Moored at Berth 1, Pier 10 on Friday afternoon Moved "dead-stick" to BAE Systems shipyard on Feb. 4.

July 29, Capt. Jeremy Gray relieved Capt. Robert T. Bryans, Jr., as the 20th CO of Mobile Bay during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

October 26, USS Mobile Bay moved "dead-stick" from BAE Systems shipyard to Berth 2, Pier 3 on Naval Base San Diego Underway for sea trials from Nov. 23-25 Underway again on Feb. 19 Moored at Wharf 311, NWS Seal Beach for ammo onload from Feb. 2?-25.

February 26, 2021 USS Mobile Bay moored at Berth 2, Pier 3 on Naval Base San Diego Underway again from March 8-12, March 22-26, May 17-20 and May 24-27 Moored at Bravo Pier for a brief stop to onload ammo before underway for routine training on June 1 Returned home on June 4.

June 13, The Mobile Bay moored at Berth 2, Pier 3 on Naval Base San Diego after a three-day underway in the SOCAL Op. Area Underway again from June 15-17.


Service history

World War II

Following a Chesapeake Bay shakedown and a brief training cruise to Casco Bay, Mobile departed for the Pacific, arriving Pearl Harbor on 23 July 1943 for a month of further training. On 22 August, she sailed west, joining Task Force 15 (TF 15) the following day for a raid on Marcus Island on 31 August. She participated in two more carrier raids from Hawaii before joining the 5th Fleet for the Gilberts campaign. She screened the ships of TF 15 as they struck at Tarawa Atoll on 18 September, and the ships of TF 14 hitting Wake on 5–6 October. On 21 October, she sailed west again in Task Group 53.3 (TG 53.3). By 8 November, she was off Bougainville Island covering reinforcement landings. Thence she steamed to Espiritu Santo, where she joined TG 53.7 for the assault and occupation of Tarawa. From the landings at Betio on the 20th-28th, she remained in the area supporting the Marine assault forces as they fought the first vigorous beachhead opposition to an American amphibious landing.

On 1 December, Mobile was reassigned to TF 50 (Fast Carrier Forces, Pacific Fleet), the nucleus of what was to become TF 38/58. From the Gilberts, this force moved north for air attacks on Kwajalein and Wotje in the Marshalls. From there, the force returned to Pearl Harbor. Mobile continued on to San Diego, where she arrived and reported for escort duty to Amphibious Forces, 5th Fleet on 29 December.

Fifteen days later, sailing with TG 53.5, she began to make her way back to the Marshalls. Detached on 29 January 1944, Mobile, with other of Cruiser Division 13 (CruDiv 13), bombarded Wotje and then rejoined their task force for the assault and occupation of Kwajalein. Until 6 February, she performed fire support and carrier screening duties off Roi and Namur. She then proceeded to Majuro where, on the 12th, she joined TF 58.

The mission of the fast carrier forces had by this time evolved into sealing off designated enemy-held atolls and islands which the Allies intended to take and interdicting others to isolate and keep to a minimum Japanese resistance at the target. Now a third mission was to be added, the pounding of major enemy bases without the aid of land-based aircraft, leaving little or no need for a return visit. Thus, to ease the occupation of Eniwetok and to aid in the encirclement of Rabaul, TF 58 departed Majuro and sailed for the Carolines. On the 16th-17th, they devastated Truk, the best fleet anchorage in the Mandated Territories, the base of the Japanese combined fleet and the center for air and sea communications between Japan and the Bismarck Archipelago. The force then sailed northwest to the Mariana Islands for strikes on Saipan, Tinian, and Guam, encountering heavy aerial resistance there on the 21st-22nd. After a brief respite for replenishment at Majuro, Mobile sailed to Espiritu Santo, where the ships of TG 58.1 were reorganized as TG 36.1 on 12 March. On the 15th, they steamed northwest to cover Marine forces as they landed on Emirau on 20 March.

By the 24th, Mobile ' s first anniversary, she had steamed over 70,000 miles and participated in 11 operations against the enemy. Three days later, her group once again became TG 58.1 and readied for further strikes on enemy installations. From 29 March to 3 April, they struck at the Palaus, Yap, and Woleai, returning to Majuro on the 5th. Next they supported Allied landings at Aitape, Humboldt Bay, and Tanah Merah Bay in New Guinea, and bombarded Wake Island and Sawar Airfield on 21–22 April. From there, they returned to the Carolines where they conducted air strikes on Truk and bombarded Satawan on 29–30 April, hit Ponape on 1 May, and then headed back to Majuro to replenish and rearm in preparation for the Marianas campaign.

On 6 June, the carrier force sortied from Majuro again. By the 11th, they were in the Marianas, striking at Saipan, Tinian, Guam, and Rota. From then through the 17th its planes and ships ranged from the Volcano and Bonin Islands to the southernmost Marianas supporting the assault on Saipan and preventing Japanese reinforcements from reaching that beleaguered island and the next target, Guam. On the 18th, searches for a Japanese Fleet, reportly en route from the Philippines, began to the west of the Marianas. The following day the Battle of the Philippine Sea opened with a Japanese carrier-based aircraft attack on the ships covering the Saipan assault. In the ensuing battle, Mobile continued her role as a guardian of the carriers, often dispatching her OS2U Kingfishers on antisubmarine and rescue missions, while planes from the carriers inflicted irreparable damage on Japanese aircraft strength and sank Hiyō on the 20th, bringing the number of Japanese carriers lost to three, Shōkaku and Taihō having been sunk by Cavalla and Albacore on the 19th.

Retiring from the area on the 23rd, the carrier force proceeded to Pagan Island, against which strikes were launched on the 24th, and then made for Eniwetok. Thence, on the 30th, they departed for further strikes on the Bonin and Volcano Islands on 4 July, before turning south once again to continue coverage of the Marianas campaign. Commencing daily strikes on Guam and Rota 6 July, the force remained in the area until after the landings on Guam. On the 23rd, TG 58.1 with Mobile in the inner protective ring, steamed southwest for raids in the Western Carolines. Three days later they pounded Yap, Ulithi, and Fais, while TGs 58.2 and 58.3 hit the Palaus. On the 30th, TF 58 retired to Saipan, arriving 2 August.

Underway again the same day, they headed back to the Bonin and Volcano Islands. As carrier planes bombed enemy installations on Iwo, Chichi, Ani, and Haha Jimas on 4 August, Mobile was detached with CruDiv 13 and Destroyer Division 46 (DesDiv 46)) to make an anti-shipping sweep in the Chichi Jima area. In the ensuing hours Mobile assisted in the sinking of one destroyer and a large cargo vessel. The following day she participated in the bombardment of Chichi Jima, and then set course for Eniwetok.

Mobile ' s fast carrier group, now designated TG 38.3, began September with strikes on the Palaus from the 6th-8th, then sailed west, raiding Mindanao on the 9th-10th, and the Visayas, on the 12th-13th. On the 15th, the group returned to the Palaus to cover the landings on Peleliu and Angaur. By the 18th the ships of TG 38.3 were headed back to the Philippines. On the 21st, the force’s planes struck at the Manila area, and on the 24th swept the Visayas again.

The force sortied from Ulithi once again on 6 October to pave the way for the upcoming Philippine operations. After the carrier planes had struck enemy installations in the Ryūkyūs, Mobile was detached with Gatling and Cotten to search for and destroy two enemy ships 30 miles distant from the force. Reaching the area, they discovered only one large cargo ship, the other vessel having been disposed of by several of the carrier planes. The three men-of-war quickly sank the cargo ship and rejoined TF 38 for strikes on Formosa and the Pescadores.

On the 13th, Mobile was again detached and with others of her division formed a screen around Canberra and Houston, wryly designated "Cripple Division 1" (CripDiv 1). Mobile and her companions, playing up erroneous reports issued by the Japanese as to the degree of damage inflicted on "the defeated and fleeing" American force, hoped to draw out the Japanese in chase, so that the carrier task force could destroy them. With the discovery of the waiting American force by Japanese scout planes, orders were changed. Canberra and Houston were towed eastward for repairs and Mobile rejoined TG 38.3 on 17 October.

The next day the force cruised to the east of the northern Philippines and on the 20th guarded the northern air approaches to Leyte as American forces streamed ashore. For the next few days, strikes were conducted throughout the Visayas and on southern Luzon. On the 24th, TG 38.3 was attacked by planes from Vice Admiral Jisaburō Ozawa's Mobile Fleet as they stood by Princeton. As the Battle for Leyte Gulf raged over the Philippines, TF 38.3 fought in the Battle off Cape Engaño on the 25th, then pursued the Mobile Fleet back toward Japan. Assigned to search for and destroy crippled enemy vessels and their escorts, Mobile aided in sinking Chiyoda and Hatsuzuki, then turned south to rejoin the main body of TF 38.

For the next 2 months, the cruiser continued to operate in support of the Philippine campaign, guarding the carriers as they sent their planes to cover Allied assault forces in the Visayas and on Mindoro. On 26 December, she departed Ulithi for the west coast, arriving 16 days later at Terminal Island Calif., for overhaul and alterations.

Back at Ulithi on 29 March, she continued on to Okinawa, arriving on 3 April, two days after the initial attacks on that Japanese bastion. Assigned to TF 51, Amphibious Forces, Pacific Fleet, for the next two months, she provided fire support, served on antiaircraft and antisubmarine patrols and saw duty as a unit of "flycatcher" groups assigned to detect and destroy Shinyo kamikaze boats before they caused any damage. At the end of May, she arrived at Leyte where she joined TG 95.7, Philippine training group, with which she operated for the remainder of the war.

Post-War

On 20 August, she cleared San Pedro Bay and headed north toward Okinawa and Japan for duty supporting the occupation. In September, she conducted several cruises between Japan and Okinawa, transporting liberated POWs on the first leg of their return to the United States. The following month she cruised in the Sasebo area and on 18 November, with Marine Corps and Navy men embarked, she departed for San Diego. Arriving on 2 December, she conducted another "Magic Carpet" run before steaming to Puget Sound for inactivation. Decommissioned on 9 May 1947, she entered the Reserve Fleet at Bremerton and remained there, in reserve, until 1 March 1959 when she was struck from the Naval Vessel Register. She was sold for scrapping to Zidell Explorations, Inc., on 16 December 1959, and was towed away for scrapping on 19 January 1960.


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MOBILE LKA 115

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Charleston Class Amphibious Cargo Ship
    Keel Laid January 15 1968
    Launched October 19 1968 as Attack Cargo Ship (AKA)
    Redesignated Amphibious Cargo Ship (LKA) January 1 1969

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each name of the ship (for example, Bushnell AG-32 / Sumner AGS-5 are different names for the same ship so there should be one set of pages for Bushnell and one set for Sumner). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each name and/or commissioning period. Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.

Postmark Type
---
Killer Bar Text

Post Office Established September 20 1969 - Disestablished February 4 1994

Locy Type
FDC 2(n+) Sep 20, 1969

Commissioning. Cachet states AKA-115 in error. Cachet by USS Cleveland Chapter No. 25, USCS

Locy Type
FDC 2(n+) Sep 20, 1969

Commissioning. Cachet states LKA-115 correctly. Cachet by Morris W. Beck

Locy Type
LDC 2-1(n+) Feb 4, 1994

Other Information

MOBILE earned four Campaign Stars for Vietnam Service
* Vietnamese Counteroffensive - Phase VII
July 23-26 1970
August 9-12 1970
September 8-10 1970
September 12-14 1970
September 19-23 1970
April 15-18 1971
* Consolidation I
October 30 to November 3 1971
November 17-19 1971
* Consolidation II
January 17-22 1972
February 6-20 1972
* Vietnam Ceasefire
March 30 to April 3 1972
April 8 to May 27 1972
June 14-16 1972
June 19-21 1972
June 24 to July 15 1972

MOBILE earned the Combat Action Ribbon, the Navy Unit Commendation Ribbon, the Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation Ribbon, three Navy Battle "E" Ribbons, two National Defense Service Medals, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal (w/ 4 Campaign stars), the Southwest Asia Service Medal, the Humanitarian Service Medal and the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal during her Naval career.

NAMESAKE - A city in the southwestern part of Alabama, located at the mouth of the Mobile River and at the head of Mobile Bay.

There has been four ships of the US Navy named MOBILE - USS Mobile (Side-wheel Steamer 1863), USS Mobile ID-4030, USS Mobile CL-63 and USS Mobile LKA-115.

If you have images or information to add to this page, then either contact the Curator or edit this page yourself and add it. See Editing Ship Pages for detailed information on editing this page.


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