Information

Stern of USS Maury (DD-100)


U.S. Destroyers: An Illustrated Design History, Norman Friedmann .The standard history of the development of American destroyers, from the earliest torpedo boat destroyers to the post-war fleet, and covering the massive classes of destroyers built for both World Wars. Gives the reader a good understanding of the debates that surrounded each class of destroyer and led to their individual features.


Kamikaze Images

On April 6, 1945, a kamikaze plane hit the destroyer USS Leutze (DD-481) (pronounced "Loyt΄-zee"), killing seven and wounding 34 [1]. The bomb carried by the kamikaze plane exploded and caused heavy damage by nearly blowing off Leutze's fantail, but damage control crews worked frantically and kept the ship from sinking. However, the mangled Leutze stayed at Kerama Rettō for over three months until July 10, 1945, when repairs finally were completed to make the ship seaworthy for the trip back to the States. Walter Fillmore, author of War History of USS Leutze (DD-481), served as Combat Information Officer on the destroyer from her commissioning on March 4, 1944, to October 1, 1945. This short history of Leutze includes many interesting historical photos. As the title indicates, this book focuses on Leutze's war history, but it does not contain that many personal stories from officers and crew.

Fillmore writes the history with short sentences and a matter-of-fact style. Although the book does not mention sources used, the author clearly performed extensive research in order to write an overview of World War II and a detailed history of Leutze. The book's first four chapters mainly provide a summary of key events leading up to US entry into WWII and the course of the war through the Allied invasion of Normandy in June 1944. These chapters also give some details of Fillmore's family and childhood. Throughout the book, Fillmore uses the term "Jap," commonly used by Americans during the war but now considered a pejorative name. The publisher has a "disclaimer" at the front of the book to state that the term has been allowed since the book is clearly intended to be a factual history and the author's use of the term "Jap" represents terminology of the past.

After an overly long general introduction to the war, the ship's history finally begins in Chapter V, which mostly covers battle action between October 1944 and January 1945 in the Philippines. On November 1, 1944, Leutze and other destroyers began firing at Japanese planes in a mass kamikaze attack. A kamikaze crash sank the destroyer Abner Read, and kamikaze planes also severely damaged the two destroyers closest to Leutze. Although Leutze originally had the nickname of Never Sail since she was launched in October 1942 but not commissioned until March 1944, in the Philippines she got the new nickname of Lucky Leutze, an apt description as she remained unscathed during the frequent air attacks in Leyte Gulf. Leutze also experienced several kamikaze attacks in Lingayen Gulf during January 6-9, 1945, but the closest calls came from two suicide explosive motorboats, which the destroyer's gunners shot and destroyed. Luck finally ran out for Leutze, when friendly fire from some nearby LSTs wounded six Leutze sailors right after the explosion of the second suicide boat.

Chapter VI describes Leutze's support of underwater demolition teams during the Battle of Iwo Jima. On February 17, 1945, shore batteries on Mt. Suribachi fired on the destroyer, with the fourth salvo making direct hits on the forward stack and the ammunition magazine under the bridge. Commander Robbins was critically wounded, and three other men were seriously wounded. Lieutenant Grabowsky took command of the ship when Robbins fell down paralyzed with a piece of shrapnel imbedded in his spinal cord.

The last chapter covers Leutze's time in Okinawa, including the kamikaze hit and the long stay at Kerama Rettō before repair of the damaged ship. In the late afternoon of April 6, 1945, about a dozen kamikaze planes headed toward Leutze and Newcomb, two destroyers escorting the battleship Tennessee. Five kamikaze planes hit Newcomb and killed 40 men. Five planes dove at Leutze. The gunners from another ship shot down the first one Leutze's gunners got the next three and the last suicide plane barely missed and crashed into the ship's wake. Leutze moved alongside her stricken sister ship, Newcomb, to help fight fires and attend to the wounded. Another kamikaze plane came in, grazed the Newcomb amidships, and crashed into Leutze's port quarter at water level. Captain Grabowsky pulled away from Newcomb as he radioed that Leutze was in danger of sinking. The crew managed to put out the fires and keep the ship afloat, and the minesweeper Defense towed the damaged destroyer through the night to Kerama Rettō. The ship's crew had to wait for three long months before repairs were finished so the ship could return to the US. During that time, they experienced over 100 air raids, hid under smoke screens at night, and witnessed firsthand the devastation caused by kamikaze attacks as crippled ships were towed to Kerama Rettō. This chapter includes about ten pages of photos of ships seriously damaged by kamikaze strikes.


Leutze crew members inspect
damage from kamikaze crash

Walter Fillmore writes his ship's history in a detached manner even though he served as Combat Information Officer during the entire period of Leutze's service during World War II. He never describes his duties aboard ship nor his personal involvement in the destroyer's key battles. The book does contain some lighter reminiscences, such as four pages, including two pages of photos, about the ceremony with Shellbacks and Pollywogs when Leutze crossed the equator. However, War History of USS Leutze (DD-481) lacks personal accounts from the ship's officers and crew about most battle action, including the kamikaze strike that put the ship out of action.

1. These casualty figures come from the casualty report prepared by the Leutze's Medical Officer on April 7, 1945 (pp. 224-6). The book's text indicates "47 casualties, seven killed" (p. 150), even though the Medical Officer's report lists the names of only 41 total casualties, with seven killed.


USS KIDD DDG 100

Is an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer in the United States Navy. She is the third Navy ship named after Rear Admiral Isaac C. Kidd, who was on board Arizona during the attack on Pearl Harbor, and was the first American flag officer to die in World War II.

Kidd was christened by Admiral Kidd’s granddaughters, Regina Kidd Wolbarsht and Mary Kidd Plumer on 22 January 2005 at Ingalls Shipbuilding in Pascagoula, Mississippi. Commander Richard E. Thomas of Westwood, New Jersey, served as her first commanding officer until February 2008. Commander Charles P. Good of Huntington Beach, California, took Kidd on her maiden deployment.

While in the midst of final outfitting, the ship was holed and partially flooded at the shipyard docks during Hurricane Katrina on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, requiring a return to dry dock for repairs, which included cutting out a turbine, delaying her commissioning and deployment with the Navy. She was commissioned at Galveston, Texas on 9 June 2007. Kidd is currently homeported in Everett, Washington.

In the 2009 science fiction film Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen, USS Kidd fires at and destroys a Decepticon named Devastator with a railgun (mounted in place of the standard 5-inch gun) during the movie’s climactic battle in Egypt. Moments earlier in the film the captain of USS John C. Stennis queues USS Kidd into action but the hull of USS Preble is shown instead. The footage of the combat information center and the forecastle with the railgun was shot on USS Kidd.

On 5 January 2012, Kidd rescued the 13-member crew of the Iranian-flagged fishing vessel Al Molai from Somali pirates who had been holding them hostage for over 40 days, capturing fifteen pirates in the process with no casualties.

On 10 March 2014 the ship joined the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 two days after it went missing over the South China Sea. Kidd was the second Navy ship to be deployed in the search. It joined USS Pinckney, and more than 40 other ships and 32 aircraft from Malaysia, Australia, China, India, Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, Taiwan, Vietnam, New Zealand, and the Philippines taking part in the search and rescue. On 14 March it was announced that Kidd would be relocated to the Indian Ocean in search of the plane, since new evidence points to the possibility of the plane being there.

On 24 April 2020, the United States Navy reported that a sailor assigned to Kidd had tested positive for the virus after being medically evacuated the previous day from operations at sea. After the sailor’s test returned positive, the Navy sent a medical team to the ship to conduct contact tracing and test sailors for the virus on board. By the morning of 24 April, 17 additional sailors had tested positive.


Stern of USS Maury (DD-100) - History

USS Israel , a 1060-ton (standard displacement) Little class destroyer built at Quincy, Massachusetts, was commissioned mid-September 1918. She briefly performed escort duty along the Atlantic Coast, then accompanied a convoy to Gibraltar, where she arrived five days before the 11 November Armistice brought the fighting to an end. Israel operated in the Mediterranean Sea until July 1919, when she returned to the United States. In 1920 the destroyer was converted to a light minelayer, receiving the designation DM-3 in July 1920, though apparently continuing to wear her destroyer number, "98". During 1921 and the first months of 1922 Israel was active off the East Coast and in the Caribbean area. Decommissioned in July 1922, she was laid up at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, for nearly a decade and a half. USS Israel was stricken from the list of Navy ships in January 1937 and sold in April 1939.

This page features, and provides links to, all the views we have concerning USS Israel (Destroyer # 98, later DM-3).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Courtesy of William H. Davis, 1980.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 48KB 740 x 460 pixels

Photographed circa 1920, just after she had been converted to a light minelayer.
Though formally designated as DM-3 in July 1920, she is still wearing her destroyer number, "98".

Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1973.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 41KB 740 x 470 pixels

U.S. Navy destroyers at Villefranche, France, 1919

These ships are (from left to right): USS Israel (Destroyer # 98), USS Schley (Destroyer # 103) and USS Stribling (Destroyer # 96).

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 76KB 740 x 575 pixels

Light Minelayers (ex-destroyers)

At the Boston Navy Yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts, circa mid- 1921.
Photographed by H.J. Darley, 46 Water Street, Charlestown, Massachusetts.
These ships, all still wearing their destroyer bow numbers with the mine force insignia painted on immediately behind, are (from left to right):
USS Mahan (DM-7, formerly DD-102)
USS Lansdale (DM-6, formerly DD-101)
USS Maury (DM-5, formerly DD-100) and
USS Israel (DM-3, formerly DD-98).
The original print bears a hand-written note referring to a Commandant, Boston Navy Yard letter of 4 October 1921.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 92KB 900 x 585 pixels

Fore River Shipbuilding Company, Quincy, Massachusetts

USS Israel (Destroyer # 98) and USS Maury (Destroyer # 100) on the building ways, 20 June 1918. They were the builder's hull #s 304 and 306. Two more destroyers are further to the left, with their construction less advanced.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 154KB 590 x 765 pixels

Miss Dorothy Brown ,
Sponsor of USS Israel (Destroyer # 98)

Holding the Sponsor's bouquet, during the ship's launching ceremonies at the Fore River Shipbuilding Company shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts, 22 June 1918.

Collection of the Society of Sponsors of the U.S. Navy.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 71KB 740 x 540 pixels

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Page made 27 April 2005
Page divided and new image added 19 November 2005


Samuel Eliot Morison Memorial Library

The Samuel Eliot Morison Memorial Library holds a collection of research materials related to the history of USS Constitution. The 2,400-volume library focuses on the history of USS Constitution, the United States Navy, the United States Marine Corps, general maritime history, and local and federal period history. The library also houses over 800 rolls of microfilm containing primary source material from the National Archives, Library of Congress, and manuscript repositories across the country.

The reading room is open to the public by appointment, and welcomes researchers of all ages and levels of interest. Materials from the museum’s archival collections may be viewed in the reading room upon request.*

Researchers are also welcome to submit reference inquiries using the form below, by mail, or by phone. Curatorial staff will provide up to 15 minutes of research free of charge. Fees will apply for requests in excess of 15 minutes at a rate of $10 per 15 minutes.


The True Story of the USS Kidd, the Ship Used to Film 'Greyhound'

When it comes to World War II memories, the Merchant Marine doesn’t get as much love as it should. Leave it to Tom Hanks to shed a little light on just how dangerous the life of a merchant mariner really was.

Merchant Mariners in World War II depended on armed Allied naval forces to protect them. The 2020 movie “Greyhound” takes place aboard one of those ships, a U.S. Navy destroyer. It was filmed aboard a real World War II-era destroyer, the USS Kidd.

During wartime, the Merchant Marine becomes an activated component of the U.S. Naval Reserve. In World War II, crippling British shipping was a key tactic of the Axis pact, so Merchant Marine ships immediately became high-priority targets for Nazi submarines.

These merchant seamen suffered an almost 4% overall casualty rate, compared to 2.94% for the Marine Corps, 2.08% for the Army (and Army Air Forces) and .88% for the Navy. It was a tough job, and they needed protection.

In “Greyhound,” Hanks plays the skipper of a U.S. Navy destroyer, the USS Keeling (codenamed Greyhound). The Keeling is one of four Allied destroyers protecting a convoy of 37 shipping vessels and their crews. In the early days of the war, these convoys had to pass through the mid-Atlantic Gap, three days of sailing where air cover couldn’t help protect them.

It was a real-life gap known as “The Black Pit,” the most dangerous days of the journey. Fletcher-class destroyers like the USS Kidd were critical in the convoys’ defenses. While the Keeling (the ship portrayed in “Greyhound”) was purely fictional, the Kidd on which the film was shot has a turbulent history and served only briefly in the Atlantic.

The USS Kidd was launched in 1943 and named for Adm. Isaac C. Kidd, who was killed aboard the USS Arizona during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor -- the first American flag officer to die in World War II. The Kidd started its career on escort duty with battleships in the Atlantic and the Caribbean. Later in 1943, it sailed for the Pacific War.

Kidd was part of the naval forces that hit some of the biggest names in the Pacific Theater: Rabaul, Bougainville, Tarawa, Guam and the Marianas. The ship was forced back to Pearl Harbor to make repairs in August 1944 but quickly returned to the fight. It arrived in time to support the February 1945 invasion of Okinawa, battering the island defenses, protecting the fleet from mines and shooting down kamikaze attacks.

Tragically, the Kidd suffered its own kamikaze attack while repelling air raids from Japanese dive bombers and kamikazes on April 11, 1945. The direct hit killed 38 sailors and wounded 55. It continued firing as it fought to stay afloat and headed back to its task force. After the kamikaze attack, the USS Kidd’s war was over.

By August, the Fletcher-class destroyer was on its way home to the United States via Pearl Harbor. It was in the Pacific Reserve Fleet from 1946 until the Korean War. In 1951, the USS Kidd was recommissioned and was used for shore bombardment and anti-submarine operations against North Korea until 1953. It continued anti-submarine and show-of-force missions throughout the early days of the Cold War until 1964, when it was finally decommissioned.

USS Kidd would be preserved as a museum ship and moored in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. To this day, the vessel is the only World War II-era destroyer in its original World War II configuration. The Kidd is the only place anyone can view an authentic WWII destroyer as it would have sailed in 1945.

This is likely why the producers of “Greyhound” chose to film aboard the Kidd instead of the other two Fletcher-class destroyers now moored as museum ships.


5 of the Worst US Navy Ship Collisions in History

The recent collisions involving the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) and USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) have generated a lot of headlines.

But there have been other collisions – though they are certainly rare events, according to a June USA Today article. But even one is far too many, and some have been even worse than those suffered by those two destroyers.

The U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV-18) in drydock at Bayonne, New Jersey, showing the damage to the carrier’s bow from her 26 April 1952 collision with USS Hobson (DMS-26). Wasp collided with Hobson while conducting night flying operations in the Atlantic, en route to Gibraltar. Hobson was cut in two and sank, 61 men of her crew could be rescued, but 176 were lost. (US Navy photo)

April 26, 1952: The USS Wasp (CV 18) collides with the USS Hobson (DD 464)

While making her way to the Mediterranean Sea, the Wasp was conducting night-time flight operations when she made a course change. A deadly combination of a surface-search radar and a poorly-thought out course-change by the destroyer caused the Wasp to ram the Hobson. The impact broke the Hobson in half and killed 176 sailors, including the Hobson’s captain.

The Wasp was repaired and back in action within 10 days. The Navy ultimately blamed the commanding officer of the Hobson for the collision.

What was left of USS Frank E. Evans (DD 754) after her collision with the aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne. (US Navy photo)

June 3, 1969: The HMAS Melbourne rams the USS Frank E. Evans (DD 754)

For over two decades, the United States was a member of the Southeast Asia Treaty Organization. This alliance also included Australia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Thailand, the Philippines, France, and the United Kingdom. SEATO was hoped to be a NATO for the region, but it never reached that potential — although allies did hold exercises.

Five years previously the Melbourne had rammed and sunk an Australian destroyer.

During an anti-submarine warfare exercise, there was a near-miss between the Melbourne and the destroyer USS Everett F. Larson (DD 830). Despite that near-miss, tragedy struck when in the early-morning hours of June 3, the Frank E. Evans cut in front of the Melbourne. Her bow was sheared off and sank, causing the deaths of 74 American sailors.

The collision resulted in a Navy training film, “I Relieve You, Sir,” or “The Melbourne-Evans Incident,” that was used to disseminate the lessons learned from this tragedy.

Damage done to USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) after her collision with USS Belknap (CG 26). (US Navy photo)

November 22, 1975: The USS Belknap (CG 26) collides with the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67)

This collision is notable for the extensive damage the Belknap sustained. During operations in the Ionian Sea, the Belknap and John F. Kennedy collided. A burst pipe sent fuel onto the guided-missile cruiser, and a massive fire melted the Belknap’s aluminum superstructure.

Eight sailors died, and 48 were injured. This collision actually has shaped the ship that is the backbone of the fleet today. After studying the collision and fire, the Navy decided to make the Arleigh Burke-class destroyers out of steel.

The Belknap was rebuilt over the course of four years, and served as the flagship of the Sixth Fleet from 1986 to 1994, before she was sunk as a target in 1998.

USS Greeneville (SSN 772) in dry dock after her collision with the Japanese fishery training ship Ehime Maru. (US Navy photo)

February 9, 2001: The USS Greeneville (SSN 772) rams the Ehime Maru

The Improved Los Angeles-class nuclear attack submarine USS Greeneville collided with the Ehime Maru, a fishery training ship for a high school while surfacing. The Ehime Maru sank very quickly, with nine people dead as a result.

A number of civilian visitors were aboard the sub at the time, and the failure of the Greeneville’s captain to ensure that their presence didn’t hamper military operations was a contributing factor to the fatal incident.

The next year, the Greeneville would collide with the amphibious transport dock USS Ogden (LPD 5), and suffer minor damage.

Sailors aboard the Los Angeles-class fast-attack submarine USS Hartford (SSN 768) wait for the brow to be lowered during the ships return home to Submarine Base New London after a month-long surface transit from Bahrain in 2009. The sub’s sail is askew as a result of her collision with USS New Orleans (LPD 18). (US Navy photo)

March 20, 2009: The USS Hartford (SSN 768) collides with the USS New Orleans (LPD 18)

Navigational chokepoints are called that because maritime traffic has to go through them, and they are very narrow. This doesn’t leave a lot of room for error or complacency.

According to a 2009 Military Times report, though, the crew of the Hartford got complacent, and the Los Angeles-class submarine and the San Antonio-class amphibious transport collided.

The Hartford suffered over $100 million in damage, while the New Orleans had a ruptured fuel tank and spilled 25,000 gallons of diesel fuel into the sea. There were 15 sailors injured on the Hartford, which was almost knocked onto its side.

MORE POSTS FROM WE ARE THE MIGHTY:

We Are The Mighty (WATM) celebrates service with stories that inspire. WATM is made in Hollywood by veterans. It's military life presented like never before. Check it out at We Are the Mighty.


Operational history

Assigned first to Destroyers, Scouting Force then to Destroyers, Battle Force, Perkins was homeported at San Diego, California and operated in the eastern Pacific prior to World War II. At Mare Island Naval Shipyard for overhaul, 7 December 1941, she reported for convoy escort duty on the 15th and on the 17th was en route to Pearl Harbor. By 15 January 1942 she was back at Mare Island for the installation of new radar equipment and on the 25th she returned to Hawaii.

On 2 February she departed Pearl Harbor with Chicago, for the southwest Pacific. On the 14th she joined Australian, New Zealand and other U.S. ships in the ANZAC Squadron then charged with protecting the eastern approaches to Australia and New Zealand. Through the spring, she continued operations with that squadron, steaming at times with fast carrier forces as they plied the Coral Sea to strike at enemy encroachments, escorting refueling units to rendezvous areas, and screening larger ships of her own and combines forces as they blasted enemy positions from New Guinea to the Solomon Islands.

On 1–2 May, the squadron joined with TF㺋 and TF㺑, then screened the carriers of those forces as their planes struck at Tulagi to open the Battle of the Coral Sea. Detached on the 7th, the squadron steamed to the Louisiade Archipelago to intercept a Japanese amphibious attack on Port Moresby via the Jomard Passage. That afternoon the ships were attacked by land based planes and in driving them off contributed to the diverting of the Japanese force, thus accomplishing the mission without engaging the enemy ships and setting the stage for the final action of the Battle of the Coral Sea—the carrier battle on 8 May.

As the carrier forces fought to a draw, the ANZAC squadron continued to patrol to the southeast of Papua. On the 10th the squadron headed for Australia and for almost two months Perkins escorted convoys and patrolled off harbor entrances along that country's Coral and Tasman Sea coasts. During this time, Perkins was one of several major Allied vessels in Sydney Harbour during the Japanese midget submarine attack of 31 May 1942. [ 1 ]

On 11 July she sailed for Auckland, thence to Noumea. Convoy escort duty between Suva and New Caledonia followed and in mid-August she was forced back to New Zealand for propeller repairs. On the 20th, however, she sailed for Pearl Harbor where repairs were completed and additional radar equipment and 40 mm guns were installed.

In mid-November Perkins headed west again, arriving at Espiritu Santo on the 27th. Three days later she departed Segond Channel in Rear Admiral Carleton Wright's cruiser-destroyer force to intercept and destroy enemy forces attempting to reinforce their units on Guadalcanal. At 2315, 5 radar contacts were made and a few minutes later the Battle of Tassafaronga was engaged. Perkins loosed 8 torpedoes, scoring none, then turned her guns on the beach. Undamaged in the encounter she turned toward Tulagi to assist the burning Pensacola, while Maury went to assist New Orleans. Continuing operations from Tulagi, she bombarded the Guadalcanal coast and served on escort assignments until January 1943. A brief availability at Noumea followed and by the 13th she was back at Tulagi for further escort and support missions.

At the end of April Perkins joined TF㺊 for tactical training and in May she returned to Australia to join the forces gathering for the thrust up the New Guinea coast to gain control of the Huon Peninsula. Into the summer the base at Milne Bay grew. At the end of June, Allied amphibious forces moved into Nassau Bay, just south of Salamaua, and into the Trobriands. Infantry units pressed toward Salamaua-Australians from Wau in the foothills of the Owen Stanley Range and Americans from Nassau Bay. PT boats punched at the enemy's Finschhafen-Lae supply line and AAF and RAAF planes bombed and strafed Japanese installations as far as Wewak and Madang.

On 21 August Perkins, flagship of DesRon 5, led Smith, Conyngham, and Mahan out of Milne Bay to make a sweep of Huon Gulf then bombard Finschhafen. On the night of 22–23 August they accomplished their mission and brought naval gunfire back to the New Guinea campaign after its absence through 18 months of ground fighting.

On 4 September Perkins bombarded the coast between the Bulu and Buso rivers, then covered Allied soldiers as they streamed ashore at Red Beach and headed toward Lae. On the 8th, she trained her guns on the isolated garrison at Lae and on the 15th the last remnants of that garrison pulled out. Salamaua, dependent on Lae, had already fallen and on the 16th Allied forces marched into Lae.

Finschhafen fell 2 October, the scouring of the river valleys commenced, and the increase in Allied traffic in Huon Gulf, together with the presence of Japanese submarines, brought Perkins back to escort duty. Reinforcements were escorted to Langemak Bay and to Scarlet Beach east of Satelberg. In November escort duties continued. Then, on 28 November 1943, she departed Milne Bay for Buna, steaming independently. Shortly before 0200 on the 29th a dark image emerged from the blackness and a few minutes later the Australian troopship Duntroon rammed her on the portside, amidships. Splitting in two, Perkins went down and took four of her crew with her to a watery grave approximately 2 miles off Ipoteto Island.


Stern of USS Maury (DD-100) - History

Construction of the third nuclear-powered and second Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) was authorized by Congress in fiscal year 1970. The ship was named for the 34th President of the United States and General of the Army Dwight David Eisenhower (Oct. 14, 1890 - March 28, 1969).

October 11, 1975 The Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Dwight D. Eisenhower was christened during an 1100 EST ceremony in Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company. Mrs. Mamie Doud-Eisenhower, widow of the late president served as the ship's sponsor. Capt. William E. Ramsey is the prospective commanding officer.

July 30, 1977 The aircraft carrier departed for its first underway period at sea to conduct Builder&rsquos sea trials in the Virginia Capes operating area (VACAPES). Lt. David L. Hallanbeck of Helicopter Combat Support Squadron (HC) 6 accomplished the first landing on board in a Sikorsky VH-3A Sea King. Acceptance trials with INSURV were conducted Aug. 23-24.

September 12, PCU Dwight D. Eisnehower was delivered to the U.S. Navy and departed for its first Dependent's Cruise to homeport of Naval Station Norfollk.

September 15, First aircraft launch and arrested landing by Grumman C-1A Trader, piloted by Capt. Ramsey, during the certification trials, Sept. 15-20.

October 18, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower was commissioned during a ceremony at Pier 2 on Naval Station Norolk.

October 20, Cmdr. Gary F. Wheatley, commander of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 1, accomplished the first jet landing on board in A-7E Corsair II from Attack Squadron (VA) 46. Lt. Cmdr. David L. Newton and Lt David Anderson of the Strike Aircraft Test Directorate accomplished the first jet catapult launch in A-6E Intruder on Oct. 21.

November 7, The Ike departed Norfolk for Carrier Qualifications, with the CVW-1, and damage contron training off the coast of Cuba Port visit to Guantanamo Bay, Nov. 24-26.

December 3, An A-7E Corsair II, assigned to Attack Squadron (VA) 72, suffered a mechanical malfunction and crashed shortly after launching from catapult No. 4. Lt. Cmdr. Harold Andersen ejected and the ship launched a motor whaleboat, assisted by a Sikorsky SH-3D from HS-11, to recover him. The Sea King crew dropped a swimmer to retrieve the pilot, but Andersen apparently had become entangled in his parachute and drowned.

January 5, 1978 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed homeport for a four-week Shakedown cruise in the Puerto Rican Area of Operation Anchored off the coast of St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, from Jan. 21-23.

February 15, CVN 69 underway again to the Roosevelt Roads and Jacksonville operating areas.

March 1, An HH-46A, assigned to Helicopter Combat Support Squadron (HC) 16, encountered mechanical difficulties while in the plane guard position about 100 yards off Ike&rsquos starboard quarter, about 60 miles southeast of Jacksonville, Fla. The Sea Knight crashed into the water tail first and sank, inverted, disappearing from view in barely 30 seconds. Two of the men were recovered. Lt. j.g. Frederic L. Bell and ADC John R. Bazan were lost at sea.

March 4, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., for a three-day visit. Upon returning to sea, the ship began gearing up for the Combined Weapons Training Exercise (Operation Shamrock) that was held on March 17, about 60 miles off the coast of Savannah, Georgia Returned to Norfolk on March 18.

March 28, The Eisenhower arrived in Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) Entered the dry-dock on April 8 Undocked on June 3.

July 9, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed for a four-day underway period to test various systems and its first "Father/Son" cruise off the coast of Virginia.

September 18, The Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Naval Station Norfolk for type training off Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico, embarking VF-142, VF-143 and VAQ-138 as new squadrons to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7 Port visit to Saint Thomas from Sept. 28-30 and Oct. 9-11 Returned home on Oct. 26.

November 14, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier departed for a three-week task force readiness exercise in the western Caribbean. GULFEX involved 20,000 U.S. and British servicemembers, 36 ships, two submarines and more than 300 aircraft Anchored off Ft. Lauderdale from Nov. 24-26 Conducted Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE) from Nov. 27- Dec 1 Returned home on Dec. 4.

January 16, 1979 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for its maiden Mediterranean deployment.

January 27, The Ike pulled into Rota, Spain, for a three-day port call Turnover with the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) in the Mediterranean Sea on Feb. ?.

February 9, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Naples, Italy, for a three-day visit.

February 10, Capt. James H. Mauldin relieved Rear Adm. William E. Ramsey as the 2nd CO of CVN 69 during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

February 19, The Ike anchored again off Naples for a five-day port call after a seven days of flight operations in the Ionian Sea.

From Feb. 26 through March 4, the Eisenhower participated in National Week XXVI/Sardinia 1-79, a combined task force exercise involving over 50 ships and 300 aircraft from various NATO countries.

March 6, The Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Venice, Italy, for a six-day port visit Anchored again off Naples for upkeep from March 20- April 3.

April 10, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower pulled into Athens, Greece, for a five-day port call Inport Livorno, Italy, from April 17-21 Participated in a "multi-dimensional warfare" exercise MULTIPLEX 1-79, involving dual battle group training with USS America (CV 66), in the Ionian Sea from April 22-28.

May 4, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier pulled into Haifa, Israel, for a 10-day port visit.

From May 17-24, the Ike took part in the final two phases of the three phase maritime support Operation Dawn Patrol. Eighty other NATO vessels participated in the huge exercise, including USS America and the French aircraft carrier Clemenceau (R 98).

May 28, USS Dwigh D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Lisbon, Portugal, for a week-long port visit.

June 15, The Eisenhower anchored off Naples for a two-week standdown period after participating in a Spanish air defense exercise Poopdeck 2-79, from June 12-13.

July 13, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Norfolk after a six-month deployment. Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7 made 8,580 arrested landing and logged 19,674 hours.

August 1, The Ike comenced a three-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) while moored at Pier 2 on Naval Station Norfolk.

November 6, The aircraft carrier departed homeport for a 10-day underway period for Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) and damage control training Underway again for CQ with FRS and Training Command from Nov. 26- Dec. 8.

January 4, 1980 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for a Refresher Training (REFTRA) in the Guantanamo Bay operating area Conducted Type Training from Jan. 18-24 and Fleet/Training Command carrier qualifications from Jan. 26-29, in Jacksonville and Virginia Capes Op. Areas Returned home on Feb. 8.

February 20, CVN 69 departed Norfolk for Type Training II off Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico Port visit to St. Thomas from March 2-5 Conducted Type Training Three and Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE) from March 5-18.

April 15, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Naval Station Norfolk for a surge Indian Ocean deployment in light of tensions in the Arabian Gulf Area.

May 7, After a 12,000 mile voyage around the Cape of Good Hope, the Eisenhower BG relieved USS Nimitz (CVN 68) Battle Group in the Gulf of Oman Naval Zone of Operations (GONZO) station.

July 17, The Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Singapore for a five-day liberty port visit.

December 9, The Ike departed U.S. 7th Fleet AoR after relieved by USS Independence (CV 62).

December 22, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Norfolk after a historic 254 days at-sea with only one liberty visit.

Janury 28, 1981 The Dwight D. Eisenhower entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard (NNSY) for a Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) Underway for sea trials on May 11.

May 27, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for Fleet Carrier Qualfications Underway for CQ and Father/Son Cruise from June 8-13 Underway for Refresher Training (REFTRA), in the Guantanamo Bay Op. Area, on June 17 A nchored off St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, from July 2-6.

July 3, Capt. Edward W. Clexton, Jr., relieved Capt. James H. Mauldin as commanding officer of the Eisenhower.

July 23, The Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Naval Station Norfolk after conducting Type Training Phase I,II and READEX 2-81 in the Puerto Rican Op. Area.

August 20, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed homeport to participate in Magic Sword, Ocean Venture and Ocean Safari, collectively billed as NATO&rsquos largest joint maritime exercises in 25 years. During Ocean Venture Phase IV, the Eisenhower opposed Canadian and Coast Guard forces, and then waged a "carrier vs. carrier war" against its counterpart, USS Forrestal (CV 59). CVN 69 completed Magic Sword North by launching simulated strikes into Norway to support allied forces making amphibious landings, after which it rendezvoused with a huge combined force of 19,000 men, 60 ships and 280 aircraft for Ocean Safari.

September 18, The Ike anchored off the coast of Lisbon, Portugal, for a four-day port visit Anchored off Portsmouth, England, from Sept. 24-29 Returned to Norfolk on Oct. 7.

October 28, The Dwight D. Eisenhower departed homeport for a four-week Type Training Phase III and Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE) in the Puerto Rican Op. Area Inport Brdgetown, Barbados, from Nov. 12-16.

January 5, 1982 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for its third deployment.

January 17, The Eisenhower anchored in Tangier Harbor, Morocco, for a three-day visit to conduct turnover with USS Nimitz (CVN 68). Both carrier battle groups then participated with the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) BG in multi threat exercise National Week XXXI, Jan. 20-30.

January 30, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Naples, Italy, for a two-week Stanndown period Anchored in Tangier Harbor again from Feb. 22-28 Participated in exercise Sardinia from March 1-8.

March 15, The Dwight D. Eisenhower pulled into Haifa, Israel, for a four-day port call Anchored off Athens, Greece, from March 24-31.

March 31, Cmdr. Donald L. McCrory relieved Capt. Thomas S. Treanor as CO of the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7.

April 2, An C1A "Mamie" crashed shortly after 1614, during the logistics flight to Naval Support Activity Souda Bay, Crete. Low ceilings and poor visibility hampered rescuers, who finally discovered the wreckage strewn across the northeast side of a 1,400 foot mountainside about four miles from Souda Bay&rsquos navigational beacon. Eleven men died, including pilots Cmdr. Richard W. Beiser and Lt. Cmdr. Bruce L. Cook.

From April 10-12, the Eisenhower conducted training anchorage in Souda Bay, Crete Inport Alexandria, Egypt, from April 14-18.

April 26, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off Naples, Italy, for a six-day visit Participating in exercise Distant Drum, in the Tyrehenian Sea, from May 2-16. Anchored off Naples again for upkeep period from May 17-31.

June 11, CVN 69 anchored off the coast of Monte-Carlo for a four-day visit to the tiny Principiality of Monaco.

From June 15-27, the Dwight D. Eisenhower conducted operations in the eastern Mediterranean Sea and was involved in Lebanon evacuation on June 24 Anchored off Palma de Mallorca, Spain, from June 30- July 3.

July 13, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Norfolk after more than a six-month Mediterranean deployment.

August 16, The Dwight D. Eisenhower entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for two-and-a-half month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

November 26, The Ike departed homeport for a two-week Refresher Training in the Guantanamo Bay Op. Area.

January 7, 1983 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Naval Station Norfolk for Type Training Phase I in the Puerto Rican Op. Area.

January 25, The Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., for a four-day port visit and to embark 200 male "Tigers" Returned to Norfolk on Feb. 5.

February 24, The Dwight D. Eisenhower underway again for another round of Type Training off Puerto Rico Inport St. John, Antigua, before conducting Type Training Phase III and ORE, from March 8-12.

March ?, During hot refueling of two Tomcats from VF-142 near the starboard foul line, the starboard wing of a Viking from VS-31 struck one of the F-14As, ripping its probe from the S-3A. Fuel immediately began streaming from the Tomcat over the crowded flight deck, quickly spreading under aircraft with engines turning over and live missiles attached. ADC Raymond L. Goodwin, the VF-142 line supervisor, seeing a potential disaster unfolding, immediately directed a tow tractor to the stricken aircraft. Climbing atop it, he stopped the flow of fuel as the volatile liquid cascaded over him. Chief Goodwin&rsquos rapid and spontaneous reaction prevented what would most certainly have erupted into a catastrophic fire, buying the ship precious moments as the crash and salvage team responded.

March 17, An F-14A from VF-143, piloted by Lt. William G. Welch and Lt. j.g. Wolfgang E. Thiel, and an F-14A from VF-142, piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Kenneth W. Pritchard and Ens. Daniel P. Hummel, colided and crashed at sea, while the ship was conducting Type Training Phase III off Puerto Rico. An SH-3D from HS-5 recovered Welch and Thiel, but Pritchard and Hummel perished during ejection. During the same exercise, an F-14A, assigned to Fighter Squadron (VF) 142, suffered a hydraulic failure, caught fire and crashed at sea. Cmdr. John M. Sumnick, CO of VF-142, and Lt. j.g. Christopher U. Browne were recovered with minor injuries.

April 27, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Naval Station Norfolk for its fourth major deployment.

From April 29-30, the Eisenhower participated in exercise Solid Shield after completing the Refresher Training (REFTRA) for Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, off the coast of Virginia.

May 9, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower relieved the USS Nimitz (CVN 68) as flagship for Commander, Battle Force, U.S. 6th Fleet, in the Mediterranean Sea Anchored off Naples, Italy, from May 11-15.

May 13, Rear Adm. Jerry O. Tuttle relieved Rear Adm. Edward H. Martin as Commander, Task Force 60 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Eisenhower.

May 30, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower arrived in Taranto, Italy, for a four-day port call after participating in exercise Distant Drum, with British, Canadian, French, Italian and Turkish forces, from May 16-27 Inport Athens, Greece, for upkeep from June 18-28.

June 25, Cmdr. Joseph W. Prueher relieved Capt. Donald L. McCrory as commanding officer of the CVW-7.

July 9, The Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Naples Harbor after an eight-day liberty visit for dual carrier operations with the USS Coral Sea (CV 43) in the cental and western Mediterranean Inport Livorno, Italy, from July 16-20.

After operating in the central and eastern Mediterranean for just the couple of days, the Eisenhower was ordered to put on speed for the Gulf of Sidra due to rising tensions with Libya.

From August 15-26, the Eisenhower participated in exercise Bright Star '83 with USAF and Egyptian forces, pitting her aircraft against Egyptian MiGs and her Tomcats intercepting three Boeing B-52H Stratofortresses flying from Minot AFB, North Dakota, to Cairo, Egypt, (simulating Soviet bombers) 1,050 n.m. from the ship Arrived off the coast of Beirut on Aug. 26.

September 3, Technical Representative William B. Hewitt of Texas Instruments, Inc., were found dead in Storage Compartment No. 1-44-2-Q. The Navy did not identify an apparent cause of the accident.

September 17, A Sea King from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 5 rescued a downed Lebanese Air Force pilot after he ejected from his crippled aircraft off the coast of Lebanon.

From October 6-10, The Dwight D. Eisenhower participated in exercise Display Determination, in the Aegean Sea, with the British and Turkish Navy.

October 21, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast Naples, Italy, for its first port visit after a consecutive 93 days at sea. By that point the ship steamed 23,000 miles and launched 5,400 sorties.

October 23, A suicide bomber identified with the Free Islamic Revolutionary Movement, a group affiliated with Hezbollah, drove a five-ton Mercedes truck loaded with explosives, around 0620 on Sunday, into the marine barracks at Beirut, Lebanon, killing 241 marines and sailors assigned to the 1st Battalion, 8th Regiment, 2nd Marine Division. A second bomber drove a vehicle into the nearby French barracks, killing 56 paratroopers. During this crisis the Ike prepared to sail with 12 hours notice. On the 25th, the U.S. Navy ordered USS Dwight D. Eisenhower to make speed for the eastern Mediterranean and the ship issued an emergency recall of all hands, standing out of Naples early the following morning.

From November 1-20, the Eisenhower, along with USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) and USS Independence (CV 62), operated off the coast of Lebanon.

December 2, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Naval Station Norfolk following a seven-month deployment.

April 17, 1984 The Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Newport News Shipyard for three-day underway to conduct sea trials, following a four-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) Underway for Refresher Training (REFTRA) in the Puerto Rican Op. Area on May 8.

May 28, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Lisbon, Portugal, for a two-day port visit Anchored off Portsmouth, England, from June 1-5.

From June 6-7, the Ike sailed off the coast of Normandy, France, to participate in the 40th anniversary commemoration of the D-Day landings of World War II Inport Brest, France, from June 9-14 Returned home on June 20.

June 26, The Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Naval Station Norfolk for FRS Carrier Qualifications.

July 6, Capt. Richard C. Macke relieved Capt. Edward W. Clexton, Jr., as commanding officer of the CVN 69.

From July 10-19, the Eisenhower conducted Refresher Training Phase 1A in the Jacksonville Operating Area Underway for Dependent's Day Cruise on July 20 Underway for Refresher Training Phase 1B, in the Puerto Rican Op. Area, on Aug. 9 Inport St. Thomas from Aug. 17-22.

From August 22-25, the Ike conducted Refresher Training Phase II Participated in MSR Harpoon firing exercise from Aug. 26-30 Conducted ORE from Aug. 31- Sept. 4 Returned home on Sept. ? Emergency sortied to evade the Tropical Storm Gustav and Hurricane Fran on Sept. 12.

October 10, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Naval Station Norfolk for its fourth Mediterranean deployment, its fifth overall.

October 12, AD3 Charles D. Elliott, assigned to Attack Squadron (VA) 66, is lost at sea after a 20 foot wave swept him overboard.

From October 26-27, the Eisenhower conducted a turnover with USS America (CV 66) in Augusta Bay, Sicilty Conducted operations in the eastern Mediterranean from Nov. 1-20 Participated in a joint air defense exercise Se Wind, with Egyptian forces, from Nov. 5-7 Anchored off Athens, Greece, from Nov. 21-25.

December 2, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower arrived in Haifa, Israel, for a nine-day port call Anchored in Naples Harbor for upkeep period from Dec. 21- Jan. 2.

From January 26-31, 1985, the Dwight D. Eisenhower participated in Med-1-85, National Week XXXIII and Dasix, multi-national exercises that "spanned the entire Mediterranean and all warfare areas" operating with large numbers of NATO ships and aircraft, including USS Independence (CV 62).

February 1, CVN 69 arrived in Toulon, France, for a nine-day port visit. Five Tomcats flew ashore to Orange-Caritat AB for exercises with the French Air Force&rsquos 1/5, 2/5 and 3/5 Squadrons, equipped with F-1B/C Mirages Anchored off the coast of Naples, Italy, for upkeep from Feb. 18-25.

March 7, The Eisenhower emergency sortied from Palma de Mallorca, Spain, after a six-day port visit, in response to national tasking due to rising tensions resulting from the Lebanese Civil War. HS-5 dispatched an SH-3D to operate for 14 days from USS Mississippi (CGN 40) and USS Spruance (DD 963) in the eastern Mediterranean, to stand ready for the potential evacuation of U.S. civilians from the devastated country before returning to the carrier.

April 14, An A-7E, assigned to Attack Squadron (VA) 66, suffered an engine failure and crashed in the eastern Mediterranean. Lt. Kevin J. Rooney ejected safely.

April 15, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off Naples for a five-day port call Turnover with the USS Nimitz (CVN 68) in Augusta Bay, Sicily, from April 21-23 Departed the U.S. 6th Fleet AoR on April 27 Anchored off the coast of Bermuda, to disembark the Commander, Carrier Group EIGHT Staff and to pick up "Tigers," on May 5.

May 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Norfolk after a six-month deployment.

July 8, The Eisenhower departed homeport for CQ with the CVW-7 and TRACOM while en route to Jacksonville Op. Area Participated in READIEX 2-85 with the USS Saratoga (CV 60) and several surface and submarine units from July 17-21 Inport Bridgetown, Barbados, from July 23-27.

From July 27- Aug. 4, the Dwight D. Eisenhower conducted training in the Panama Op. Area Anchored off Montego Bay, Jamaica, from Aug. 5-9 Conducted operations off the eastern coast of Guatemala and Honduras, after a heightened tensions resulting from fighting against Marxist rebels in the region, in mid-August Returned home on Aug. 22.

From Sept. 9-19, the Eisenhower conducted carrier qualifications with the Reserve Carrier Air Wing (CVWR) 20, off the coast of Virginia Underway for Dependent's Day Cruise on Sept. 21 Moved "dead-stick" to Norfolk Naval Shipyard, to avoid the Hurricane Gloria, on Sept. 27 Underway for exercise Ocean Safari on Oct. ?.

October 26, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower entered the Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. for a Complex Overhaul (COH).

October 18, 1986 Capt. Gary L. Beck relieved Capt. Richard C. Macke as commanding officer of the Dwight D. Eisenhower.

April 26, 1987 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Naval Station Norfolk after completing a complex overhaul at Newport News, during which time some 1,100 crewmembers lived on board berthing vessel General William O. Darby (IX-510), in addition to 300 duty section watchstanders who lived on board each night. The 18-month yard period included the addition of the Close-in Weapons System, NATO Sea Sparrow Missile System, Navy Tactical Data System, Anti-Submarine Warfare module, communications upgrades and rehabilitation of 1,831 berths in 25 compartments.

June 15, The Ike departed homeport for a five-week Shakedown cruise in the Guantanamo Bay Area of Operation Anchored off La Guaira port, Venezuela, for a goodwill visit to Caracas from July 8-12 Underway for Refresher Training on Aug. 14.

August 20, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower recorded its 100,000th arrested landing, while underway in Virginia Capes Op. Area.

From August 28- Sept. 5, the Eisenhower was underway for Carrier Qualifications (CQ) Underway for Dependent's Day Cruise on Sept. 6 Underway again for CQ from Sept. 29- Oct. 3.

From October 20-30, the Dwight D. Eisenhower was operating off the coast of Virginia for Advance Phase Carrier Qualifications Anchored off the coast of Charlotte Amalie in St. Thomas, V.I., from Nov. 4-8 Returned home on Nov. 23 Underway again on Dec. 1.

December 4, The Eisenhower arrived in Montego Bay, Jamaica, for a three-day port call Returned to Norfolk on Dec. 10 Underway in the Virginia Capes Op. Area from Dec. 11-16.

January 11, 1988 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed homeport for a two-week underway period, to conduct CQ and FLEETEX 1-88, in the Puerto Rican Op. Area.

February 29, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled Mediterranean deployment.

March 15, The Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Cagliari, Sardinia, for a turnover with the USS Coral Sea (CV 43) Anchored off Palma de Mallorca, Spain, fron March 18-25 Anchored off Toulon, France, from March 29- April 4.

April 11, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Marseille, France, for a week-long libert port visit Anchored off Augusta Bay, Sicily, for training from April 21-22 Anchored off the coast of Cannes, France, from April 24-30.

From May 2-15, the Dwight D. Eisenhower participated in all three phases of exercise Dragon Hammer in the Aegean, Tyrrhenian and Ionian Seas Anchored again in Augusta Bay from May 16-19 Anchored off Antalya, Turkey, from May 23-27.

From May 30- June 3, the Dwight D. Eisenhower participated in a multi-force exercise Poopdeck, in the eastern Mediterranean Anchored off Palma de Mallorca, Spain, for a liberty port visit from June 19-29 Participated in exercise Optimize '88, with various NATO sea and air units, from June 20-24.

June 27, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Naples, Italy, for an eight-day upkeep Anchored off Haifa, Israel, before participating in a combined exercise Juniper Falconry, from July 10-11 Anchored off Haifa again from July 15-17.

July 26, The Dwight D. Eisenhower arrived in Livorno, Italy, for a week-long port visit Anchored off Cannes, France, from Aug. 8-15 Conducted turnover with the John F. Kennedy (CV 67) on Aug. 16 Embarked several hundred male "Tigers" off the coast of Bermuda on Aug. 27.

August 29, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Norfolk after a six-month deployment. While entering Hampton Roads at 0820, The Ike collided with the 897-foot Spanish bulk carrier Urdulitz. The Spanish vessel lay anchored at Berth Z, Anchorage A, adjacent to the Entrance Reach Channel, waiting to gain access to the coal loading piers at Lamberts Point, Norfolk. The accident resulted in an estimated $2 million damage to the aircraft carrier.

September 27, Capt. Joseph. J. Dantone relieved Capt. Gary L. Beck as the 6th commanding officer of CVN 69.

October 3, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a five-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA).

March 13, 1989 The Eisenhower returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a four-day underway for sea trials. During the SRA at NNSY, additional work was required to repair the No. 2 aircraft elevator resulting from the collision with Urdulitz. The ship also gained the capability to operate F/A-18 Hornets Underway for Carrier Qualifications (CQ), off the coast of Virginia, from March 20-2?.

From April 17-28, the Ike conducted independent steaming operations, serving as a test platform for F-14A-plus. Fighter Squadrons (VF) 142 and 143 are first to transition to the new aircraft.

From May 4-19, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower participated in a joint exercise Solid Shield '89, while underway in the Cherry Point Op. Area Underway for Fleet Carrier Qualifications from July 14-20 Underway for CQ with the CVWR-20 from July 24- Aug. 3 Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Aug. 5 Underway for Refresher Training (REFTRA), in Virginia Capes Op. Area, on Sept. 18.

October 6, The Ike departed Norfolk for Advanced Phase Training in the Cherry Point Op. Area Anchored off the coast of Port Everglades, Fla., for a liberty visit to Ft. Lauderdale from Oct. 20-23.

October 31, A rogue wave struck elevator #2, while the Eisenhower was underway about 90 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, N.C., washing three sailors, 38 air-to-air missiles and two ammunition transports over the board. AN Carroll A. Washington and AO2 Dave Walker were rescued by an SH-3H SAR helicopter from HS-5, an hour later. AOAN Craig A. Harris was lost at sea.

January 15, 1990 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed homeport for CQ in the Virginia Capes Op. Area. After a port visit to Ft. Lauderdale from Jan. 23-25, the carrier participated in a two-week Fleet Exercise (FLEETEX) 1-90 in the Puerto Rican Op. Area.

March 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for its seventh major deployment.

From March 20-27, the Eisenhower participated in exercise National Week 90B, with the USS Forrestal (CV 59) Battle Group Anchored in Augusta Bay, Sicily, for turnover from March 28-29.

March 31, An F/A-18A, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 136, experienced a "catastrophic" left engine failure followed by loss of flight controls and crashed into the water, at about 1610, during routine operations in the western Mediterranean. Lt. Cmdr. William J. Henderson was rescued within 10 minutes.

April 2, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower arrived in Toulon, France, for an eight-day port call Participated in a joint exercise Distant Thunder 90-1, with the British and Turkish naval forces, from April 14-21.

April 22, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Haifa, Israel, for a week-long liberty port visit Participated in exercise Dragon Hammer, consisting of combined operations, coordinated air defense, and maritime and amphibious training, from April 29- May 15.

May 18, The Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Cannes, France, for a week-long liberty port visit in conjunction with the International Film Festival Deployed 4 F/A-18A Hornets to Sidi Ahmed Airfield, Tunisia, to conduct dissimilar air combat training, from May 20-24.

From June 2-6, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower took part in Journey to Victory, a commemoration of the Allied landings in Normandy Anchored off Portsmouth, England, from June 6-11.

June 15, The Ike anchored off the coast of Palma de Mallorca, Spain, for a week-long liberty port visit Inport Marseille, France, from June 25-29 Anchored off Monaco from July 2-6 Anchored off Cannes, France, from July 12-20 Anchored off Naples, Italy, from July 27- Aug. 2 T ransited the Suez Canal southbound on Aug. 8.

From August 9-23, the Dwight D. Eisenhower supported Operation Desert Shield, serving as a ready striking force in the event Iraq invaded Saudi Arabia and also participated in maritime interception operations in support of a United National embargo against Iraq Conducted turnover with the USS Saratoga (CV 60), while underway in the Red Sea, on Aug. 23.

September 1, The Eisenhower anchored again in Augusta Bay, Sicily, to conduct turnover with the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67).

September 12, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Naval Station Norfolk following a six-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR).

September 28, Capt. William V. Cross relieved Capt. Joseph. J. Dantone, Jr., as CO of the Eisenhower during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

October 12, The Dwight D. Eisenhower departed homeport for a week-long underway to conduct Fleet CQ, off the coast of Virginia Entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, for a four-month Selected Restricted Availabilty (SRA), on Oct. 19.

March 18, 1991 The Eisenhower departed homeport for a 10-day underway, in the Virginia Capes and Cherry Point Op. Areas, to conduct Refresher Training Underway for TRACOM-CQ, in the Jacksonville Op. Area, on April 15.

April 19, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower pulled into Port Everglades, Fla., for a three-day libert visit. More than 50,000 people visited the ship during the "Open house" weekend Returned to Naval Station Norfolk on Apri 2? Underway for Fleet Carrier Qualifications from May 15-22.

June 3, The Eisenhower departed homeport for Advanced Phase Training in the Puerto Rican Operating Area Port visit to St. Thomas, V.I., from June 14-18 Returned home in late June Underway for Fleet CQ off the coast of Virginia from July 5-?.

July 23, The Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk to participate in FLEETEX 4-91, in the Puerto Rican Op. Area Returned home on Aug. ? Underway for Training CQ and Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE), in the Key West Op. Area, from Aug. 16-2? Underway for a Dependent's Day Cruise on Aug. 31.

September 26, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for a scheduled Arabian Gulf deployment.

October 13, Lt. Cmdr. Joe F. Edwards, Jr., and Lt. j.g. Scott C. Grundmeier landed a cripled F-14B, assigned to Fighter Squadron (VF) 142, after a radome departed the aircraft in flight, damaging the windscreen and shattering the forward part of the canopy. Edwards&rsquos sustained facial lacerations and suffered a broken collar bone. He was evacuated to the International Hospital at Manama, Bahrain, for eye surgery.

October 13, The Dwight D. Eisenhower BG transited the Suez Canal southbound Relieved the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) in the Red Sea on Oct. 17 T ransited the Strait of Hormuz northbound on Oct. 31.

November 9, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Dubai, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day libert port visit Anchored off Dubai again from Nov. 27- Dec. 4 and Dec. 22- Jan. 2.

From January 3-13, 1992, the Eisenhower participated in a joint U.S. and Saudi naval exercise Red Reef III, in the Gulf of Oman and northern Arabian Sea Five F-14Bs deployed to Shaikh Isa, Bahrain, to participate in a joint aerial exercise Neon Arrow from Jan. 20-26.

January 21, CVN 69 anchored off the coast of Dubai, U.A.E., for a five-day liberty port visit Participated in a joint strike exercise Eager Archer with the Kuwaitis in late January Transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound on Feb. 4 Participated in exercise Beacon Flash, in the northern Arabian Sea, from Feb. 8-13.

February 20, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower pulled into Jedah, Saudi Arabia, for a three-day port call after taking part in a joint exercises Indigo Anvil and South Thunder, in the south central Red Sea, launching strikes against Saudi forces defending Bisha, Khamis Mushait and Taif Conducted turnover with the USS America (CV 66) on Feb. 26 Transited the Suez Canal northbound on Feb. 27.

March 1, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Palma de Mallorca, Spain, for a five-day liberty port visit.

From March 10-21, the Ike participated in NATO exercise Teamwork '92 off the coast of Scotland, that postponed her own scheduled homecoming by a week, but allowed USS Saratoga (CV 60) to return home sooner.

April 2, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a two-day Tiger Cruise from Bermuda, completing the six-month deployment.

June 17, The Eisenhower departed homeport for a two-week underway to conduct CQ with the CVW-7 and TRACOM, in the Virginia Capes and Cherry Point Op. Areas Underway for Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE) preparations from July 20-24 Underway for Fleet/TRACOM CQ and ORSE, in the Virginia Capes and Jacksonville Op. Area, on Aug. 5.

August 15, The Dwight D. Eisenhower arrived in Port Everglades, Fla., for a four-day port call Returned to Norfolk on Aug. 2? Underway again for Fleet CQ, off the coast of Virginia, on Sept. 10 After conducting ammo offload with the USS Suribachi (AE 34), returned home on Sep. 22 Underway for CVW-7, CVWR-20 and Training Command (TRACOM) CQ from Nov. 4-20.

January 6, 1993 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a Drydocking Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA).

March 20, Capt. Alan M. Gemmill relieved Capt. William V. Cross as commanding officer of the CVN 69.

April 21, The Dwight D. Eisenhower undocked and moored at Pier 5 on Norfolk Naval Shipyard Returned to Naval Station Norfolk on Nov. 12 Underway for sea trials from Dec. 6-9.

December 10, The Eisenhower departed homeport for flight deck certification, Cooperative Engagement Capabilty Testing (CECT) and CQ with the CVW-3 Returned home Dec. 20.

January 18, 1994 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for sea trials and TRACOM-CQ Underway for Tailored Ship's Training Availabilty (TSTA) II, in the Virginia Capes Op. Area, from Feb. 12-22 Underway for Cooperative Engagement Capabilty Testing, in the Jacksonville Op. Area, on March 15.

March 24, The Dwight D. Eisenhower arrived in Port Everglades, Fla., for a five-day port visit and to embark "Tigers" Returned home on March 3? Underway for Combat Systems Assessments and TSTA III/FEP from April 19-29 Underway for Comprehensive Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), Intermediate Training Assessment (ITA) and CEC/TMD Testing on May 19.

June 1, The Dwight D. Eisenhower arrived in Ponce, Puerto Rico, for a three-day port visit Returned home on July 1 Underway for TRACOM-CQ from July 18-27 Underway in the Virginia Capes Op. Area from Aug. 8-19.

From September 8-12, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower participated in major fleet exercise JTFEX 95-1, off the coast of Virginia.

September 14, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed for Port-au-Prince to spearhead Operation Uphold Democracy, the U.S. - led effort to restore the democratically elected government of Haiti. The carrier embarked almost 2,000 soldiers of the Army&rsquos XVIII Airborne Corps, including troops from the 10th Mountain Division and the Joint Special Operations Task Force (including SEALs and troops from the 16th USAF Special Operations Wing, the Army&rsquos 75th Ranger Regiment, 3rd Special Forces Group, 1st Special Forces Operational Detachment-Delta and 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment).

September 14, Two F-14A Tomcats, assigned to Fighter Squadron (VF) 32, collided off the coast of North Carolina, while conducting routine training mission. One aircraft safely landed at MCAS Cherry Point, the other (#161150) crashed in the Atlantic Ocean Pilot and RIO were lost at sea.

October 20, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR. This deployment marked the first time that women had deployed as crewmember of a U.S. Navy combatant.

November 5, The Eisenhower conducter turnover with the USS George Washington (CVN 73) in the Mediterranean Sea Transited the Strait of Hormuz northbound on Nov. 12 Commenced combat sorties in support of Operation Southern Watch on Nov. 15.

November 20, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a two-day liberty port visit to Dubai Transited the Suez Canal northbound on Dec. 13 Entered the Adriatic Sea in support of Operations Deny Flight, Sharp Guard and Provide Promise on Dec. 15 Anchored off the coast of Cannes, France, from Dec. 21-27.

January 13, 1995 The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier anchored off Trieste, Italy, for a five-day liberty port visit Anchored off Naples from Jan. 24-30.

From February 6 through March 17, the Eisenhower conducted operations in the eastern Mediterranean, including participation in exercise Juniper Falconry III. Port visit to Haifa, Israel, from Feb. 16-22 and Antalya, Turkey, from March 6-11.

March 18, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Rhodes, Greece, for a four-day liberty port visit Anchored off Palma de Mallorca, Spain, from March 31- April 4 Transited the Strait of Gibraltar on April 5, after relieved by USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71).

April 14, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Naval Station Norfolk following a six-month deployment.

July 17, The Dwight D. Eisenhower moved to Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company for an 18-month complex overhaul (COH) Entered the Dry Dock #11 on Oct. 11.

September 22, Capt. Gregory C. Brown relieved Capt. Alan M. Gemmill as the 9th commanding officer of CVN 69.

January 27, 1997 USS Diwght D. Eisenhower departed Newport News shipyard for sea trials Returned to Naval Station Norfolk on Jan. 29 Underway for flight deck certification from March 10-15 Underway again from March 20-27 Underway for TRACOM-CQ on April 14.

April 1?, The Dwight D. Eisenhower pulled into Port Everglades, Fla., for a scheduled visit to Ft. Lauderdale Returned home on April 28 Underway again from May 14-23 Underway en route to New York City, to participate in Fleet Week celebration, on June 11.

June 26, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier returned to Naval Station Norfolk Underway again from July 14-25 Underway for Independent Steaming Exercise (ISE) and CQ on Aug. 13. Returned home, after a Tiger Cruise from Naval Station Mayport, on Aug. 27 Underway for Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE) and CQ from Sept. 5-19.

November 3, The Dwight D. Eisenhower departed homeport for a two-week underway period to conduct Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) I/II. While visiting Nassau in the Bahamas, the ship was forced to emergency sortie with only her duty sections manned, and then performed a dangerous navigational detail as she returned during darkness.

From December 9-18, the Eisenhower was underway for TSTA III and Final Evaluation Period (FEP).

February 8, 1998 An F-18C Hornet from VFA-81 crashed in the Atlantic Ocean, near Puerto Rico, following a cold cat shot. Lt. Cmdr. Tom Halley ejected safely .

June 10, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Naval Station Norfolk for its 10th major deployment.

August 26, Capt. H. D. Starling, II relieved Capt. Gregory C. Brown as CO of the Eisenhower.

September 16, An F-18C Hornet from VFA-83 crashed in the western Mediterranean, during practice strafing run. The pilot ejected safely.

During the first four-month of the deployment, the Eisenhower was underway in Adriatic Sea, in support of Operation Deliberate Forge, and in the Mediterranean Participated in exercise Matador from July 21-27, exercise Fancy from Sept. 23-27 and exercise Dynamic Mix from Oct. 5-13 Transited the Suez Canal southbound, in support of Operation Southern Watch, on Oct. 23.

November 25, USS Enterprise (CVN 65) Battle Group relieved the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower BG on station in the Arabian Gulf.

December 10, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Norfolk after a six-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR.

February 4, 1999 The Dwight D. Eisenhower entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a four-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA).

In July, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower was underway for Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) I/II/FEP Underway for Compehensive Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) on August ?.

October ?, The Eisenhower anchored off the coast of St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, for a scheduled port visit Underway for Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) in December.

February 18, 2000 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for a scheduled deployment.

March 10, CVN 69 anchored off the coast of Trieste, Italy, for a four-day liberty port visit Participating in exercise Juniper Stallion from March 20-26 Inport Souda Bay, Greece, from March 30- April ? Anchored off Haifa, Israel, from April 14-18.

April 21, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Corfu, Greece, for a week-long liberty visit Inport Dubrovnik, Croatia, from May 1-6 Anchored off Antalya, Turkey, from May 12-17 Transited the Suez Canal southbound, in support of Operation Southern Watch, on May 20.

May 31, The Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Sitrah, Bahrain, for a four-day port call to Manama.

June 24, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day liberty visit to Dubai Inport Jebel Ali again from July 15-19.

July 26, An F-14B, assigned to Fighter Squadron (VF) 11, crashed shortly after 1000 in the Saudi desert. A helicopter rescued both aircrew and flew them to Taif AB, where they recovered in "good health."

July 28, The Dwight D. Eisenhower BG transited the Suez Canal northbound Anchored off the coast of Lisbon, Portugal, from Aug. 4-8.

August 18, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Norfolk after a two-day Tiger Cruise from Mayport, Fla., following a six-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR. The aircraft from CVW-7 launched more than 7,700 sorties and droped 33,000 pounds of ordnance in support of OSW, the first combat weapons droped in Ike's history.

October 13, Capt. Mark T. McNally relieved Capt. H. Denby Starling as commanding officer of the Eisenhower.

November 9, The Eisenhower returned to homeport after a six-day underway for flight deck certification and ammo offload with the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) and USS Detroit (AOE 4) Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Nov. 11 Underway for FRS/TRACOM CQ on Nov. 30.

December 6, An S-3B, assigned to Sea Control Squadron (VS) 32, crashed in the Atlantic around 1210 while performing a flight check, about 46 miles off the Florida coast. All crew members rescued with light injuries.

December 11, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Naval Station Norfolk Underway for TRACOM-CQ and Joint Shipboard Helicopter Integration Process (JSHIP) on Jan. 22.

February 7, 2001 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower pulled into Port Everglades, Fla., for a scheduled visit to Ft. Lauderdale.

February 21, An T-45A Goshawk, assigned to Training Squadron (VT) 22, crashed at 5.30 p.m., approximately 80 n.m. from Mayport and about a mile from the Eisenhower, while performing safety observer duties en route to the ship from NAS Jacksonville. Capt. Justin Sanders and Lt. Gregory S. Fulco were killed.

February 26, The Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Naval Station Norfolk.

May 22, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower entered the Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipbuilding for its first and only refueling in 50-year life-span. The scope of work is valued at approximately $1.3 billion and includes the refueling of both the ship’s reactors, as well as significant modernization work. Work includes a major upgrade of the island house that will involve the shipyard removing the top two levels and replacing them. This action is driven by the installation of a new antenna mast that runs down along the island and will provide for better radar capabilities. The shipyard is also integrating a new radar tower aboard the Eisenhower. Maintenance and repair work will be performed below the ship’s waterline to include the application of a new paint system. In addition, the shipyard will be replacing nearly 3,000 valves and overhauling another 600 in various ship systems.

December 15, 2002 The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier moved from Dry Dock 11 to Outfitting Berth #1 at Newport News shipyard.

April 26, 2003 Capt. Charles E. Smith relieved Capt. Mark T. McNally as the 12th commanding officer of CVN 69.

December 15, The Department of Defense announced that it awarded Northrop Grumman a modification to the contract to extend the end date for the overhaul by another 11 weeks to November 6, 2004. This raised the total cost of the overhaul from $1.36 billion to $1.49 billion.

January 25, 2005 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Naval Station Norfolk.

April 5, The Eisenhower successfully completed flight deck certification in the Atlantic Ocean. Seventeen aircraft from VFA-37, VFA-105, VS-31, VAW-121 and HS-5 accomplished over 200 traps.

May 9, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to homeport after completing a ten-day shakedown underway period. This was the fourth time that carrier has been underway since completing its four-year, mid-life overhaul in March Underway again on May 1?.

May 25, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower opened her flight deck to the French Navy during Multi-National Maritime Exercise. MNME 05-1, which incorporates more than 17,000 Sailors from Canada, France, Great Britain, Spain and the United States, is one step in the certification of forces for the NATO Response Force (NRF).

September 1, Capt. James Cloyd relieved Capt. Charles E. Smith as CO of the Eisenhower during the change of command ceremony aboard the ship.

October 20, CVN 69 returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a two-day underway for sea trials, following a four-month Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) Underway for flight deck certification and CQ on Oct. 2?.

From November 3-6, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower conducted ammo onload with the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8) Returned home on Nov. 7.

November 10, Air Force Gen. Lance L. Smith took command of NATO's Allied Command Transformation (ACT) and U.S. Joint Forces Command (JFCOM) during an assumption ceremony aboard the Eisenhower at Naval Station Norfolk.

December 1, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for Combat Systems Ship's Qualification Trials (CSSQT) and Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ Successfully launched new RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM) on Dec. 14.

From January 25-28, 2006, the Dwight D. Eisenhower conducted Carrier Qualifications (CQ) for Naval Air Training Command (TRACOM).

March 10, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Pier 12 on Naval Station Norfolk after a 25-day underway for Tailored Ship&rsquos Training Availability and Final Evaluation Period (TSTA/FEP).

March 20, The Dwight D. Eisenhower is currently underway in the Atlantic Ocean preparing for an Inspection and Survey (INSURV) Underway for INSURV assessment from March 29-30 Underway for Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) on April 12.

April 24, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Port Everglades, Florida. The port call is not related to the community's Fleet Week activities scheduled for the following week Returned home on May 8 Underway for TRACOM-CQ and Operational Reactor Safeguards Examination (ORSE) from June 1?-2?.

July 20, CVN 69 recently departed Naval Station Norfolk to participate in Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) 06-2 "Operation Bold Step" Underway for FRS-CQ on Sept. ?.

October 3, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for a scheduled deployment in support of the Global War on Terrorism, its first after more than six years.

October 14, The Eisenhower CSG entered the Mediterranean Sea after transiting the Strait of Gibraltar Anchored off Naples, Italy, from Oct. 17-21.

October 25, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower recently anchored off the coast of Limassol, Cyprus, for a scheduled port call Transited the Suez Canal southbound on Oct. 30 Conducted turnover with the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) on Oct. 31.

November 7, The Dwight D. Eisenhower is currently underway in the North Arabian Sea in support of Operation Enduring Freedom Participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the USS Saipan (LHA 2) on Nov. 20.

December 11, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, along with the USS Anzio (CG 68), transited the Strait of Hormuz northbound. During 33 days of operations in the Arabian Sea, the aircraft from CVW-7 flew more than 4,000 hours and launched 680 sorties, providing close air support and reconnaissance to International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) troops in Afghanistan.

December 22, The Eisenhower moored at Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a five-day liberty visit to Dubai.

January 8, 2007 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower recently joined the USS Bunker Hill (CG 52), USS Anzio and USS Ashland (LSD 48) to support ongoing maritime security operations off the coast of Somalia, in an effort to capture al Qaeda terrorists attempting to flee the country.

February 7, CVN 69 is currently underway in the North Arabian Sea in support of OEF.

February 26, The Ike recently pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a liberty port visit to Dubai.

April 7, Cmdr. Christopher Rankin relieved Cmdr. Gordon Smith as CO of VAQ-140 "Patriots", during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the Arabian Gulf.

April 16, Capt. Scott "Sterno" Stearney, Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7 relieved the CO of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 140, Cmdr. Christopher Rankin, due to a "loss of confidence in his ability to lead his crew and carry out essential missions." The XO Cmdr. Timothy Murphy assumed temporary command.

May 4, The Dwight D. Eisenhower CSG transited the Suez Canal northbound Anchored off the coast of Lisbon, Portugal, from May 12-16.

May 23, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Norfolk after a nearly eight-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet AoR. By the end of the cruise, CVW-7 had completed 10,397 arrested landings, flew a total of 31,273 flight hours and expended more than 140 laser-guided bombs and Joint Direct Attack Munitions on numerous targets in support of ground forces in Afghanistan and Iraq.

July 7, The Ike recently departed homeport for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ.

July 23, Capt. Scott Stearney completed his 1,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier, while the Eisenhower is underway for Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) with the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) CSG Returned home on Aug. ? Underway for TRACOM-CQ in mid-August and late September.

November 16, Capt. Dee L. Mewbourne relieved Capt. Dan Cloyd as the 14th CO of Dwight D. Eisenhower during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

December 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower is currently underway for ammunition offload with the USNS Mount Baker (T-AE 34).

January 22, 2008 CVN 69 entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard for a six-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) Underway for sea trials on July 2? Underway for flight deck certification and CQ, in the VACAPES Op. Area, on Aug. 1.

August 8, Vice Adm. Melvin G. Williams, Jr., relieved Vice Adm. Marty Chanik as Commander, U.S. 2nd Fleet during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Ike at Naval Station Norfolk.

August 21, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower recently departed homeport for TRACOM-CQ Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Aug. 30 Underway for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability and Final Evaluation Period (TSTA/FEP) on Sept. 16.

October 4, Petty Officer 2nd Class Robert Lemar Robinson was killed when he was hit by a plane, at 8:16 p.m. local time, while the Eisenhower was underway off the coast of North Carolina.

November 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower recently departed homeport for routine training and Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the CVW-3 Returned to Norfolk on Nov. 2?.

January 7, 2009 The Dwight D. Eisenhower recently departed homeport for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX).

February 21, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

February 26, A Sailor went overboard at about 4:30 p.m. while the carrier is in transit in the Atlantic. He (she) was in the water less than 30 minutes before being recovered, and was not injured.

March 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Leon Gourret Cruise Terminal in Marseille, France, for a two-day liberty port call.

March 21, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7 launched its first combat sorties in support of OEF in Afghanistan.

May 16, The Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at the newly-constructed Khalifa Bin Salman Port in Hidd, Bahrain, for a liberty port visit to Manama. The last carrier to moor pierside in Bahrain was the 11,373-ton Commencement Bay-class escort aircraft carrier USS Rendova (CVE 114) in 1948.

June 20, Command Master Chief Jeffrey J. Garber was found dead in a berthing area aboard the Eisenhower, at approximately 8:15 a.m. local time.

July 6, The Dwight D. Eisenhower CSG was relieved by USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) Carrier Strike Group in command of Task Force 50. Aircraft from CVW-7 flew more than 2,000 combat sorties in support of OEF in Afghanistan.

July 14, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Lisbon, Portugal, for a three-day liberty port visit Moored at Naval Station Mayport, Fla., for a brief stop to drop off members of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 5 and to embark "Tigers" on July 28.

July 30, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Naval Station Norfolk following a five-month deployment.

September 9, French Air Force Gen. Stephane Abrial relieved USMC Gen. James N. Mattis as NATO&rsquos Supreme Allied Commander Transformation (SACT) in a ceremony aboard the Eisenhower.

September 25, CVN 69 is currently underway for carrier qualifications in the Virginia Capes Op. Area.

November 5, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower is currently underway for a three-week Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) in preparation for an upcoming deployment next year.

November 7, The Eisenhower responded to a distress call from a civilian vessel, approximately 300 miles off the coast of Cape Hatteras, resulting in the rescue of three Canadian civilian mariners from an overturned sailboat.

November 18, Capt. Dee L. Mewbourne and Cmdr. Joe W. Barnes, the XO of "Pukin' Dogs", completed their 1,000th carrier arrested landings within minutes of each other.

January 2, 2010 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk Naval Station for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

January 21, CVN 69 entered the U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Operations (AoO), after transiting the Suez Canal.

January 28, Aircraft from CVW-7 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

February 16, Cmdr. Benjamin L. Hewlett relieved Cmdr. Thomas D. Bush as CO of the "Wildcats" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 131, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

March 17, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Jebel Ali, U.A.E., after a four-day port visit to Dubai.

March 18, Cmdr. Scott T. Farr relieved Cmdr. Timothy F. Murphy as CO of the "Patriots" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 140, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

March 31, An E-2C Hawkeye assigned to "Blutails" of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 121 crashed in the North Arabian Sea about 2 p.m. local time, five miles from the aircraft carrier, after returning from a mission in support of operations in Afganistan. Three of four crew members were rescued and returned to the Ike.

April 3, The Navy has ended the search for a missing Lt. Miroslav Steven Zilberman and declared him deceased.

June 10, The Eisenhower departed Khalifa Bin Salman Port at Hidd, Bahrain, after a routine port call.

July 2, USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) CSG relieved USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group as Commander, Task Force 50 on station in the North Arabian Sea.

July 4, The Eisenhower CSG entered the Mediterranean Sea after transiting the Suez Canal. Since entering the U.S. 5th Fleet AoR, CVW 7 has flown more than 2900 sorties and totaled 17,700 cumulative flight hours in support of OEF.

July 6, CVN 69 arrived in Antalya, Turkey, for a three-day port visit.

July 13, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Naples, Italy, for a four-day port call.

July 26, The aircraft carrier pulled into Naval Station Mayport to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise.

July 28, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to homeport after a seven-month deployment.

August 13, Capt. Marcus A. Hitchcock relieved Capt. Dee L. Mewbourne as commanding officer of CVN 69.

August 30, The Ike is currently underway off the coast of Virginia for ammunition offload with the USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77).

September 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., for a scheduled Planned Incremental Availability (PIA).

June 6, 2011 Rear Adm. Ted N. Branch, Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, relieved the Ike's XO Capt. Robert D. Gamberg following the completion of an investigation into allegations of an improper relationship. During the admiral's mast, it was determined that Gamberg was in violation of Uniform Code of Military Justice articles 133 (conduct unbecoming an officer) and 92 (failure to obey order or regulation).

June 15, CVN 69 returned to Naval Station Norfolk after completing two-day sea trials, following a nine-month maintenance period at NNSY.

June 28, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed homeport for CQ, with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 and 7.

July 2, A team from the Navy Unmanned Combat Air System program office (PMA-268) accomplished the first carrier touchdown of an F/A-18D surrogate aircraft, emulating an unmanned air vehicle, using systems developed as part of the Unmanned Combat Air System Carrier Demonstration (UCAS-D) program. The Hornet, assigned to the Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23, was equipped with X-47B precision navigation control software that will allow the X-47B to operate from the deck of an aircraft carrier in 2013.

July 11, The Eisenhower is currently underway for a Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) off the coast of Virginia.

July 25, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower pulled into Naval Station Mayport for a two-day port call.

August 3, The Ike returned home after one-week of carrier qualifications for Naval Air Training Command (NATRACOM).

August 19, CVN 69 returned to Norfolk after a four-day underway for a maintenance material management (3M) inspection and FRS-CQ.

August 25, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower emergency sortied from Naval Station Norfolk to avoid the approaching Hurricane Irene.

September 12, The Eisenhower is currently underway in the Atlantic Ocean conducting carrier qualifications.

October 12, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for a Tailored Ships Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Phase (FEP).

March 9, 2012 The Ike is currently underway for routine training in the VACAPES Op. Area.

March 16, The second Nimitz-class aircraft carrier recently departed homeport for a three-week underway period, with the Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8 and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7.

March 23, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower onloaded more than 1,000 tons of ordnance during the ammunition transfer with USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) and USNS Sacagawea (T-AKE 2), from March 21-22.

April 17, CVN 69 recently departed Naval Station Norfolk for routine training.

May 17, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower CSG completed a 23-day Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) Underway again for routine training on May 21.

June 20, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR).

July 2, An SH-60F, assigned to Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 5, rescued and transported the French pilot back to the Charles de Gaulle (R 91), after his Rafale M aircraft crashed approx. 80 miles east of Cartagena, Spain, shortly after 1400 local time.

July 3, The Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Palma de Mallorca, Spain, for a three-day port visit.

July 13, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Rhodes, Greece, for a three-day port visit Transited Suez Canal on July 18 Entered Arabian Gulf on July 25.

August 3, Cmdr. Dennis J. Vigeant relieved Cmdr. Frank B. Ogden as CO of the "Nightdippers" of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 5 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the IKE.

August 9, Aircraft from CVW-7 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

August 16, Cmdr. Timothy D. Tippett relieved Cmdr. Jon M. Taylor as CO of the "Wildcats" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 131, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

September 5, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Khalifa Bin Salman Port after a five-day port call to Bahrain.

October 23, The Ike pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a five-day visit to Dubai.

November 21, By direction of the U.S. Secretary of Defense, Leon E. Panetta, IKE&rsquos current deployment is being curtailed in support of long-term national security objectives and life-cycle maintenance requirements. The aircraft carrier will return home before the Christmas holiday, along with the USS Hue City (CG 66), to resurface its flight deck and then deploy again for Middle East in Spring 2013. The remaining ships of the CSG will finish their deployments as originally scheduled.

December 1, CVN 69 returned to the Mediterranean Sea after transiting Suez Canal. While on station in the North Arabian Sea, CVW 7 aircraft launched more than 3,000 combat sorties, delivering 10,000 pounds of ordnance in support of OEF.

December 2, Capt. Terry S. Morris relieved Capt. Samuel J. Paparo as Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Eisenhower.

December 4, Cmdr. Joe V. Martinez relieved Cmdr. Sean P. Higgins as CO of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 140 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

December 19, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a six-month deployment, three months earlier than scheduled.

February 21, 2013 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed homeport for a Middle East deployment to replace the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), after USS Nimitz (CVN 68), that was previously scheduled to deploy last month, suffered mechanical problems in November 2012.

March 7, The Eisenhower pulled into Marseille, France, for a three-day port visit Transited the Suez Canal on March 16 Arrived on station in the North Arabian Sea on March 21 Launched its first combat sorties in support of OEF on March 24.

April 8, An F/A-18F, assigned to the "Jolly Rogers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 103, crashed in the North Arabian Sea, about 12:20 p.m. local time, after experiencing an engine failure. Both crew members ejected safely and were rescued by an SH-60F Seahawk from Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 5.

April 23, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP) in Hidd, Bahrain, for a five-day port call.

May 27, The Eisenhower pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a three-day liberty visit to Dubai.

June 13, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, along with USS Hue City, returned to Mediterranean Sea after transiting Suez Canal. While on station in the Arabian Sea, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7 launched 1,367 combat sorties and flew more than 8,000 flight hours in support of OEF.

June 14, Rear Adm. Michael M. Gilday relieved Rear Adm. Michael C. Manazir as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the IKE.

June 17, Cmdr. Jesse W. Hilliker relieved Cmdr. Bobby Markovich as CO of the "Rampagers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 83, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

June 20, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Lisbon, Portugal, for a three-day port visit.

July 1, CVN 69 pulled into Naval Station Mayport, Fla., for a brief port call to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise.

July 3, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower returned to Norfolk after a four-and-a-half month deployment.

July 19, Capt. Stephen T. Koehler relieved Capt. Marcus A. Hitchcock as CO of the Eisenhower during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

August 8, The Eisenhower returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a three-day underway for ammo offload with the USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE 13).

September 10, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower entered the Dry Dock #8 at Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Va., for a 14-month Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA).

August 26, 2014 The Ike undocked and moored at Berth 42/43, Norfolk Naval Shipyard.

August 28, 2015 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed NNSY for sea trials after an extended 23-month availability Moored at Pier 14 North, Naval Station Norfolk on Sept. 1.

September 4, The Eisenhower departed homeport for a 17-day underway to conduct flight deck certifications and CVW-3/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ) Underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ on Sept. 27.

October 2, Two F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) aircraft, assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23, landed for the first time aboard the IKE, for a week-long Developmental Testing II (DT-II) period, off the coast of Virginia.

From October 13-14, the Dwight D. Eisenhower onloaded more than 2 million pounds of ordnance during an ammunition transfer with the USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5) Moored at Pier 12N on Oct. 15 Underway for FRS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ) from Nov. 2-13.

November 18, Capt. Paul C. Spedero, Jr., relieved Capt. Stephen T. Koehler as the 17th CO of Dwight D. Eisenhower during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship at Pier 14N.

November 21, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for a 24-day underway to conduct Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP), with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3.

December 1, Rear Adm. Jesse A. Wilson relieved Rear Adm. Bruce H. Lindsey as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

December 16, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Naval Station Norfolk for a two-day underway to conduct operational testing of the MK-53 Decoy Launching System (Nulka), in the Virginia Capes Op. Area.

February 7, 2016 An MH-60S Seahawk, assigned to the "Tridents" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9, rescued five distressed mariners from the U.S.-flagged S/V Selket, at approximately 40 miles off the coast of Miami, Fla., around 7 p.m. EST. They were medically evaluated aboard the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower before being transferred to USCG Air Station Miami in Opa-locka.

February 11, The Eisenhower moored at Pier 12N on Naval Station Norfolk after a 15-day underway for INSURV preparations, FRS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ) and ammo onload with the USNS William McLean (T-AKE 12) Underway for INSURV rehearsal from Feb. 17-18 Underway for INSURV assessment from Feb. 23-24.

March 4, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Pier 14N on Naval Station Norfolk after a four-day underway for a Mobile Training Team (MTT) inspection and burials at sea.

March 18, Eight Sailors on board the Eisenhower were injured this afternoon when an arresting gear parted during a routine landing by an E-2C Hawkeye, assigned to the Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 123, while the ship was conducting carrier qualifications off the coast of Virginia. Two of them have been transported to Portsmouth Naval Medical Center and four to the Norfolk Sentara General Hospital for treatment. The aircraft safely returned to Naval Station Norfolk Chambers Field.

April 14, CVN 69 returned to homeport after a 29-day underway for Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) Underway for routine training in the VACAPES Op. Area from April 18-22 Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on April 24.

June 1, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Pier 14S, Naval Station Norfolk for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

June 13, The Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 entered the Mediterranean Sea after transiting Strait of Gibraltar.

June 16, The Eisenhower, along with USS San Jacinto (CG 56), USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) and USS Mason (DDG 87), participated in exercise Flotta Verde in the Tyrrhenian Sea, with the ITS San Marco (L 9893), ITS Andrea Doria (D 553), ITS Bersagliere (F 584), ITS Comandante Cigala Fulgosi (P 490), ITS Etna (A 5326), ITS Stromboli (A 5327) and Italian Sauro-class submarine.

June 17, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored off the coast of Naples, Italy, for a four-day liberty port visit Participated in an air defense exercise (ADEX) with Turkish Naval Forces on June 25.

June 28, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, while the Ike was underway in the eastern Mediterranean.

July 4, Cmdr. Daniel W. Testa relieved Cmdr. Teague R. Laguens as CO of the "Swamp Foxes" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

July 6, Cmdr. Jeffrey A. Farmer relieved Cmdr. David B. Freeman as CO of the "Wildcats" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 131, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

July 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, along with USS San Jacinto, USS Nitze (DDG 94) and USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8), transited the Suez Canal southbound Transited the Bab-el Mandeb Strait on July 12 Transited the Strait of Hormuz northbound on July 21.

July 24, Cmdr. Jeffrey Farmer, CO of VFA-131, completed his 1,000th arrested landing on board the aircraft carrier with the trap of an F/A-18C Hornet, while the Ike was underway in the North Arabian Gulf.

August 13, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP), Bahrain, for a four-day liberty visit to Manama.

September 7, Cmdr. R. Wade Blizzard relieved Cmdr. Tracey J. Gendreau as CO of the "Swordsmen" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 32, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

September 11, A female Sailor, assigned to CVW-3, gave birth to a seven-pound girl, while the Eisenhower was underway in the Arabian Gulf. U.S. Navy official said the mother claimed to be unaware of the pregnancy after she visited the medical department on Saturday, complaining of stomach pains.

September 14, Rear Adm. James J. Malloy relieved Rear Adm. Jesse A. Wilson, Jr., as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Ike, while on station in the Arabian Gulf.

September 20, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Berth 58/59, Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day liberty visit to Dubai.

November 1, The Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Berth 6, Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP) for a four-day liberty visit to the Kingdom of Bahrain.

November 25, Commodore Andrew Burns relieved Rear Adm. James J. Malloy as Commander, Task Force (CTF) 50 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the CVN 69, while underway in the central Arabian Gulf. This marks the first time a Royal Navy flagship, HMS Ocean (L12), will lead a U.S. task force in the Middle East.

November 26, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, along with USS San Jacinto, transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound Transited the Bab-el Mandeb Strait northbound, escorted by USS Port Royal (CG 73), on Nov. 29.

December 2, Capt. Marc J. Miguez relieved Capt. Jeffrey T. Anderson as Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the CVN 69, while underway in the Red Sea.

December 4, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, along with USS San Jacinto and USS Roosevelt (DDG 80), entered the Mediterranean Sea after transiting Suez Canal.

December 5, Cmdr. Mitchell S. McCallister relieved Cmdr. Andrew P. Mariner as CO of the "Gunslingers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 105, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

December 6, The Eisenhower commenced dual carrier operations, with the FS Charles de Gaulle (R91), while underway in the eastern Mediterranean in support of OIR.

December 6, Cmdr. Brendan R. Stickles relieved Cmdr. Eric J. Sinibaldi as CO of the "Zappers" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 130, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Ike.

December 7, Cmdr. Darryl B. Martin relieved Cmdr. Jason L. Chuderwicz as CO of the "Screwtops" of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 123, during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Ike.

December 12, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower concluded its support in Operation Inherent Resolve. The CVW-3 launched 1,900 combat sorties and expended more than 1,4 million pounds of ordnance, on Islamic State targets in Iraq and Syria, from both the Mediterranean Sea and Arabian Gulf.

December 16, CVN 69 moored at Berth 163, Leon Gourret Cruise Terminal in Marseille, France, for a four-day liberty port visit Transited the Strait of Gibraltar westbound, escorted by USS Porter (DDG 78), on Dec. 22.

December 30, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Pier 14N on Naval Station Norfolk following a seven-month deployment.

February 4, 2017 The Dwight D. Eisenhower departed homeport for an 11-day underway to conduct FRS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ) Underway again for FRS/TRACOM CQ from March 14-23 Underway for a Sustainment Exercise (SUSTEX) from March 30- April 13 Moved to Pier 11S on May 8 Underway for routine training from May 16-19.

June 5, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Pier 11S on Naval Station Norfolk after a five-day underway for FRS-CQ Underway for ammo offload with the USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE 13) on June 19.

June 27, The Ike participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the USS San Jacinto (CG 56), USS Winston Churchill (DDG 81), USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5), HMCS Charlottetown (FFH 339), HMCS Glace Bay (MM 701) and HMCS Moncton (MM 708), while underway off the coast of Halifax.

June 28, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower anchored at Anchorage #1 in Halifax Harbour, Nova Scotia, for a week-long port visit, to participate in the 150th Canada Day celebration, first by U.S. aircraft carrier in nearly 18 years.

July 7, The Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Pier 11S on Naval Station Norfolk Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on July 8.

July 13, Rear Adm. Samuel J. Paparo, Jr., relieved Rear Adm. James J. Malloy as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Eisenhower at Pier 11.

July 24, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed homeport for a 10-day underway to conduct Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ.

August 4, Huntington Ingalls Inc., Newport News Shipbuilding was awarded a $36,4 million contract for the Eisenhower's Planned Incremental Availability (PIA). Work is expected to be completed by March 2018.

August 5, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Super Pier 5, Norfolk Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth, Virginia Commenced availability on Sept. 17.

August 9, 2018 Capt. Kyle P. Higgins relieved Capt. Paul C. Spedero, Jr., as CO of the Eisenhower during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

November 14, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moved "dead-stick" from Norfolk Naval Shipyard to Pier 11S on Naval Station Norfolk.

April 1, 2019 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Pier 12N on Naval Station Norfolk after a four-day underway for sea trials, following an extended 18-month availability Underway for flight deck certification and CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 on April 8.

April 18, An MV-22 Osprey, assigned to Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 263, landed for the first time on board the Eisenhower, while underway off the coast of Virginia.

April 19, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Pier 12N on Naval Station Norfolk Underway for FRS/TRACOM CQ, in the Cherry Point and Jacksonville Op. Areas, from April 26- May 8 Underway again for TRACOM-CQ from June 7-17.

June 21, Rear Adm. Paul J. Schlise relieved Rear Adm. John F. Meier as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Ike.

July 9, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Naval Station Norfolk for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ Underway in the Key West Op. Area from July 15-16 Arrived off the coast of Virginia on July 18 Returned home on July 19 Underway for INSURV rehearsal from July 23-24 Underway for INSURV assessment from Aug. 6-7 Underway again on Aug. 11.

From August 12-15, the Eisenhower received approximately 1,200 tons of ordnance during the ammunition onload with the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) and USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5).

August 16, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Pier 12N on Naval Station Norfolk Emergency sortied due to Hurricane Dorian on Sept. 4 Returned home on Sept. 7 Underway for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP), with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, on Sept. 9.

September 28, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the USS San Jacinto (CG 56), USS Vella Gulf (CG 72), USS Stout (DDG 55), USS James E. Williams (DDG 95), USS Truxtun (DDG 103), HMS Dragon (D35) and HNLMS De Ruyter (F 804), while underway off the coast of South Carolina Returned home on Sept. 29.

December 12, CVN 69 moored at Pier 14S on Naval Station Norfolk after a nine-day underway, off the coast of Virginia, for FRS-CQ.

January 17, 2020 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

February 13, The Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 recently completed the Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), in the Cherry Point, Jacksonville and Charleston Op. Areas Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5), while underway off the coast of North Carolina, on Feb. 18.

February 23, The Eisenhower conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Laramie (T-AO 203), while transiting the Atlantic Ocean eastbound Transited the Strait of Gibraltar eastbound, along with the USS San Jacinto, USS James E. Williams and USS Truxtun, on Feb. 29.

March 3, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower participated in a PHOTOEX with the FS Charles de Gaulle (R91), FS Chevalier Paul (D621) and USS San Jacinto, while underway off the east coast of Sicily Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Robert E. Peary on March 4 Transited the Suez Canal southbound on March 9 Transited the Bab el-Mandeb Strait on March 13.

March 18, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), as a "show of force" while underway in the North Arabian Sea Participated in a PHOTOEX again on March 21.

March 23, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 recently launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Freedom's Sentinel in Afghanistan.

April 1, The Dwight D. Eisenhower conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Robert E. Peary, while underway in the North Arabian Sea Participated in a PHOTOEX with the USS Bataan (LHD 5) on April 2 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Wally Schirra (T-AKE 8) on April 13 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Amelia Earhart (T-AKE 6) on April 22.

April 26, Cmdr. Chad K. Upright relieved Cmdr. Theodore J. Elkins as CO of the Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 7, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while underway in the North Arabian Sea.

May 1, Cmdr. Daniel M. Murphy, II relieved Cmdr. Thomas J. Eisenstatt as CO of the "Swamp Foxes" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

May 3, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower conducted a replenishment-at-sea, while underway in the North Arabian Sea Conducted a replenishment-at-sea again on May 11 and 18th.

May 19, Rear Adm. Brendan R. McLane relieved Rear Adm. Paul J. Schlise as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 10 during a change-of-command ceremony on board the CVN 69.

June 3, Capt. Zoah Scheneman relieved Capt. William K. Shafley, III as Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Eisenhower, while underway in the North Arabian Sea.

July 20, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, along with the USS San Jacinto and USS Truxtun, transited the Bab el-Mandeb Strait northbound Transited the Suez Canal on July 24 Participated in an air defense exercise (ADEX) with the HS Aigaion (F 460), in the vicinity of Crete, from July 25-26 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE 13) on July 27 Transited the Strait of Gibraltar westbound on July 30.

August 9, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Pier 14N on Naval Station Norfolk after 205 consecutive days at sea, breaking the previous record set by USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) in 2002 by 44 days.

September 27, The Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Pier 14N after a four-day underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ Underway for a Sustainment Exercise (SUSTEX) from Sept. 29- Oct. 11.

December 3, Rear Adm. Scott F. Robertson relieved Rear Adm. Richard J. Cheeseman, Jr., as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 2 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Eisenhower.

December 13, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Pier 14N on Naval Station Norfolk after a week-long underway, in the Virginia Capes Op. Area, for FRS-CQ.

December 17, Capt. Paul F. Campagna relieved Capt. Kyle P. Higgins as the 19th CO of IKE during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

February 14, 2021 USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Pier 14N on Naval Station Norfolk after a 33-day underway for Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), in the Cherry Point, Charleston and Jacksonville Op. Areas.

February 19, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower departed Norfolk for a surge deployment in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR).

February 26, The Dwight D. Eisenhower conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Arctic (T-AOE 8), while underway in the eastern Atlantic Ocean.

From March 3-4, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, along with the USS Mitscher (DDG 57), USS Porter (DDG 78) and RMNS Tarik Ben Ziad (FMMM 613), participated in exercise Lightning Handshake 2021, while underway off the coast of Agadir, Morocco Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Arctic on March 7 Transited the Strait of Gibraltar eastbound on March 8 Transited the Strait of Sicily on March 10.

March 11, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, along with the USS Mitscher and USS Thomas Hudner (DDG 116), participated in a PHOTOEX with the HS Psara (F 454) and ITS Virginio Fasan (F 591), while underway in the central Mediterranean Sea.

March 15, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, while the Ike was underway in the eastern Mediterranean.

March 17, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX) with the TCG Gemlik (F492) Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Arctic on March 18.

March 20, The Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at Berth K14, NATO Fuel Depot in Souda Bay, Greece, for a four-day limited liberty port call Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Arctic on March 27 Transited the Strait of Otranto northbound on March 28 Transited southbound on March 29 Arrived off the coast of Port Said, Egypt, on late Thursday evening Transited the Suez Canal on April 2.

April 10, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower moored at General Cargo Terminal in Port of Duqm, Oman, for a two-day port call Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Arctic on April 13 and 20th Participated in a PHOTOEX on April 24 Conducted a replenishment-at-sea again on April 28, May 7, 15 and 21st Moored at General Cargo Terminal in Port of Duqm from June 11-14.


Stern of USS Maury (DD-100) - History

Motion Models - Destroyers
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Order # Model Description Price Scale Length
Special Order Fletcher Class call call call
Special Order Allen M. Sumner Class call call call
Special Order Bagley Class call call call
Special Order Clemson Class call call call
Special Order Porter Class call call call
Special Order Gearing Class call call call
Special Order Charles F. Adams Class call call call
Special Order Forrest Sherman Class call call call
Special Order Spruance Class call call call
Special Order Arleigh Burke Class call call call
Special Order Arleigh Burke FLT I Class call call call
Special Order Arleigh Burke FLT II Class call call call
Special Order Arleigh Burke FLT IIA Class call call call
Special Order DD-251 USS Belknap call call call
Special Order DD-340 (DMS-17) USS Perry call call call
Special Order DD-362 USS Moffett call call call
Special Order DD-363 USS Balch call call call
Special Order DD-375 USS Downes call call call
Special Order DD-389 USS Mugford call call call
Special Order DD-390 USS Ralph Talbot call call call
Special Order DD-402 USS Mayrant call call call
Special Order DD-411 USS Anderson call call call
Special Order DD-437 USS Woolsey call call call
Special Order DD-444 USS Ingraham call call call
Special Order DD-445 USS Fletcher call call call
Special Order DD-449 USS Nicholas call call call
Special Order DD-466 USS Waller call call call
Special Order DD-471 USS Beale call call call
Special Order DD-481 USS Leutze call call call
Special Order DD-483 USS Aaron Ward call call call
Special Order DD-499 USS Renshaw call call call
Special Order DD-527 USS Ammen call call call
Special Order DD-530 USS Trathen call call call
Special Order DD-531 USS Hazelwood call call call
Special Order DD-537 USS "The Sullivans" call call call
Special Order DD-540 USS Twinning call call call
Special Order DD-544 USS Boyd call call call
Special Order DD-554 USS Franks call call call
Special Order DD-561 USS Prichett call call call
Special Order DD-565 USS Smalley call call call
Special Order DD-566 USS Stoddard call call call
Special Order DD-568 USS Wren call call call
Special Order DD-577 USS Sproston call call call
Special Order DD-579 USS William D. Porter call call call
Special Order DD-586 USS Newcomb call call call
Special Order DD-604 USS Parker call call call
Special Order DD-616 USS Nields call call call
Special Order DD-617 USS Ordronaux call call call
Special Order DD-619 USS Edwards call call call
Special Order DD-631 USS Erben call call call
Special Order DD-643 USS Sigourney call call call
Special Order DD-654 USS Bearss call call call
Special Order DD-655 USS John Hood call call call
Special Order DD-656 USS Van Valkenburgh call call call
Special Order DD-658 USS Colahan call call call
Special Order DD-660 USS Bullard call call call
Special Order DD-661 USS Kidd call call call
Special Order DD-662 USS Bennion call call call
Special Order DD-671 USS Gatling call call call
Special Order DD-677 USS McDermott call call call
Special Order DD-678 USS McGowan call call call
Special Order DD-688 USS Remey call call call
Special Order DD-690 USS Norman Scott call call call
Special Order DD-693 USS Moale call call call
Special Order DD-694 USS Ingraham call call call
Special Order DD-698 USS Ault call call call
Special Order DD-701 USS John W. Weeks call call call
Special Order DD-709 USS Hugh Purvis call call call
Special Order DD-710 USS Gearing call call call
Special Order DD-713 USS Kenneth D. Bailey call call call
Special Order DD-716 USS Wiltsie call call call
Special Order DD-717 USS Theodore E. Chandler call call call
Special Order DD-719 USS Epperson call call call
Special Order DD-724 USS Laffey call call call
Special Order DD-727 USS DeHaven call call call
Special Order DD-729 USS Lyman K. Swenson call call call
Special Order DD-730 USS Collett call call call
Special Order DD-731 USS Maddox call call call
Special Order DD-744 USS Blue call call call
Special Order DD-746 USS Taussig call call call
Special Order DD-748 USS Harry E. Hubbard call call call
Special Order DD-749/DM-29 USS Henry A Wiley call call call
Special Order DD-754 USS Frank E. Evans call call call
Special Order DD-756 USS Beatty call call call
Special Order DD-761 USS Buck call call call
Special Order DD-762 USS Henley call call call
Special Order DD-763 USS William C. Lawe call call call
Special Order DD-770 USS Lowry call call call
Special Order DD-775 USS Willard Keith call call call
Special Order DD-780 USS Stormes call call call
Special Order DD-785 USS Henderson call call call
Special Order DD-787 USS James E. Kyes call call call
Special Order DD-789 USS Eversol call call call
Special Order DD-805 USS Chevalier call call call
Special Order DD-818 USS New call call call
Special Order DD-820 USS Rich call call call
Special Order DD-826 USS Agerholm call call call
Special Order DDR-829 USS Myles C. Fox call call call
Special Order DD-833 USS Herbert J. Thomas call call call
Special Order DD-837 USS Sarsfield call call call
Special Order DD-840 USS Glennon call call call
Special Order DD-844 USS Perry call call call
Special Order DD-845 USS Bausell call call call
Special Order DD-847 USS Robert L. Wilson call call call
Special Order DD-850 USS Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. call call call
Special Order DD-853 USS Charles H. Roan call call call
Special Order DD-858 USS Fred T. Berry call call call
Special Order DD-859 USS Norris call call call
Special Order DD/DDE-860 USS McCaffery call call call
Special Order DD-865 USS Charles R. Ware call call call
Special Order DD-867 USS Stribling call call call
Special Order DD-870 USS Fechteler call call call
Special Order DD-871 USS Damato call call call
Special Order DD-875 USS Henry W. Tucker call call call
Special Order DDR-877 USS Perkins call call call
Special Order DDR-879 USS Leary call call call
Special Order DD-885 USS John R Craig call call call
Special Order DD-886 USS Orleck call call call
Special Order DD-887 USS Brinkley Bass call call call
Special Order DD-931 USS Forrest Sherman call call call
Special Order DD-937 USS Davis call call call
Special Order DD-943 USS Blandy call call call
Special Order DD-945 USS Hull call call call
Special Order DD-948 USS Morton call call call
Special Order DD-949 USS Parson call call call
Special Order DD-970 USS Caron call call call
Special Order DD-971 USS David R Ray call call call
Special Order DD-973 USS John Young call call call
Special Order DD-974 USS Comte DeGrasse call call call
Special Order DD-975 USS O'Brien call call call
Special Order DD-978 USS Stump call call call
Special Order DD-980 USS Moosbrugger call call call
Special Order DD-987 USS O'Bannon call call call
Special Order DD-990 USS Ingersoll call call call
Special Order DDG-2 USS Charles F. Adams call call call
Special Order DDG-4 USS Lawrence call call call
Special Order DDG-7 USS Henry B. Wilson call call call
Special Order DDG-15 USS Berkeley call call call
Special Order DDG-20 USS Goldsboro call call call
Special Order DDG-21 USS Cochrane call call call
Special Order DDG-34 USS Somers call call call
Special Order DDG-38 USS Luce call call call
Special Order DDG-41 USS King call call call
Special Order DDG-43 USS Dahlgren call call call
Special Order DDG-46 USS Preble call call call
Special Order DDG-51 USS Arleigh Burke call call call
Special Order DDG-52 USS Barry call call call
Special Order DDG-54 USS Curtis Wilbur call call call
Special Order DDG-56 USS John S. McCain call call call
Special Order DDG-63 USS Stethem call call call
Special Order DDG-67 USS Cole call call call
Special Order DDG-68 USS The Sullivans call call call
Special Order DDG-70 USS Hopper call call call
Special Order DDG-71 USS Ross call call call
Special Order DDG-73 USS Decatur call call call
Special Order DDG-74 USS McFaul call call call
Special Order DDG-77 USS O'Kane call call call
Special Order DDG-81 USS Winston Churchill call call call
Special Order DDG-85 USS McCampbell call call call
Special Order DDG-89 USS Mustin call call call
Special Order DDG-90 USS Chafee call call call
Special Order DDG-91 USS Pinckney call call call
Special Order DDG-97 USS Halsey call call call
Special Order DDG-98 USS Forrest Sherman call call call
Special Order DDG-99 USS Farragut call call call
Special Order DDG-108 USS Wayne E. Meyer call call call
Special Order DDG-110 USS William P. Lawrence call call call
Special Order DDG-112 USS Michael Murphy call call call
Special Order DDG-1000 USS Zumwalt call call call
Special Order DDR-875 USS Henry W. Tucker call call call
Special Order DDR-881 USS Bordelon call call call
Special Order DEG-2 USS Ramsey call call call
Special Order DL-2 USS Mitscher call call call
Special Order DL-4 USS Willis A. Lee call call call
Special Order DLG-6 USS Farragut call call call
Special Order DLG-15 USS Preble call call call
Special Order DLG-23 USS Halsey call call call
Special Order DLG/CG29 USS Jouett call call call
Special Order DM-26 USS Harry F. Bauer call call call
Special Order DM-30 USS Shea call call call
Special Order DM-34 USS Aaron Ward call call call
Special Order 4 Pipe Destroyer call call call
Special Order INS Yaffo K-42 (Isreal) call call call

Note: Models are also available in either smaller or larger scale than listed above.

To order this or any other model, please call 1-800-866-3172 from 10 AM to 5:30 PM EST weekdays or send email to Joel Rosen at [email protected]

Ask us to make any of the following Destroyer models for you!

Farragut Class

DDG-37 Farragut
DDG-38 Luce
DDG-39 MacDonough
DDG-40 Coontz
DDG-41 King
DDG-42 Mahan
DDG-43 Dahlgren
DDG-44 William V. Pratt
DDG-45 Dewey
DDG-46 Preble

Benson-Livermore Class

DD-421 USS Benson
DD-424 USS Niblack
DD-427 USS Hilary P. Jones
DD-430 USS Eberle
DD-433 USS Gwin
DD-436 USS Monssen
DD-439 USS Edison
DD-442 USS Nicholson
DD-453 USS Bristol
DD-456 USS Rodman
DD-459 USS Laffey
DD-462 USS Fitch
DD-483 USS Aaron Ward
DD-486 USS Lansdowne
DD-489 USS Mervine
DD-492 USS Bailey
DD-495 USS Endicott
DD-598 USS Bancroft
DD-601 USS Champlin
DD-604 USS Parker
DD-607 USS Frazier
DD-610 USS Hobby
DD-613 USS Laub
DD-616 USS Nields
DD-619 USS Edwards
DD-622 USS Maddox
DD-625 USS Harding
DD-628 USS Welles
DD-634 USS Doran
DD-637 USS Gherardi
DD-640 USS Beatty
DD-646 USS Stockton
DD-422 USS Mayo
DD-425 USS Madison
DD-428 USS Charles F. Hughes
DD-431 USS Plunkett
DD-434 USS Meredith
DD-437 USS Woolsey
DD-440 USS Ericsson
DD-443 USS Swanson
DD-454 USS Ellyson
DD-457 USS Emmons
DD-460 USS Woodworth
DD-463 USS Corry
DD-484 USS Buchanan
DD-487 USS Lardner
DD-490 USS Quick
DD-493 USS Carmick
DD-496 USS McCook
DD-599 USS Barton
DD-602 USS Meade
DD-605 USS Caldwell
DD-608 USS Gansevoort
DD-611 USS Kalk
DD-614 USS MacKenzie
DD-617 USS Ordronaux
DD-620 USS Glennon
DD-623 USS Nelson
DD-626 USS Satterlee
DD-632 USS Cowie
DD-635 USS Earle
DD-638 USS Herndon
DD-641 USS Tillman
DD-647 USS Thorn
DD-423 USS Gleaves
DD-426 USS Lansdale
DD-429 USS Livermore
DD-432 USS Kearny
DD-435 USS Grayson
DD-438 USS Ludlow
DD-441 USS Wilkes
DD-444 USS Ingraham
DD-455 USS Hambleton
DD-458 USS Macomb
DD-461 USS Forrest
DD-464 USS Hobson
DD-485 USS Duncan
DD-488 USS McCalla
DD-491 USS Farenholt
DD-494 USS Doyle
DD-497 USS Frankford
DD-600 USS Boyle
DD-603 USS Murphy
DD-606 USS Coghlan
DD-609 USS Gillespie
DD-612 USS Kendrick
DD-615 USS McLanahan
DD-618 USS Davison
DD-621 USS Jeffers
DD-624 USS Baldwin
DD-627 USS Thompson
DD-633 USS Knight
DD-636 USS Butler
DD-639 USS Shubrick
DD-645 USS Stevenson
DD-648 USS Turner

Sims Class

DD-409 USS Sims
DD-410 USS Hughes
DD-411 USS Anderson
DD-412 USS Hammann
DD-413 USS Mustin
DD-414 USS Russell
DD-415 USS O'Brien
DD-416 USS Walke
DD-417 USS Morris
DD-418 USS Roe
DD-419 USS Wainwright
DD-420 USS Buck

Benham Class

DD-397 USS Benham
DD-398 USS Ellet
DD-399 USS Lang
DD-402 USS Mayrant
DD-403 USS Trippe
DD-404 USS Rhind
DD-405 USS Rowan
DD-406 USS Stack
DD-407 USS Sterett
DD-408 USS Wilson

Somers Class
DD-381 USS Somers
DD-395 USS Davis
DD-396 USS Jouett
DD-394 USS Sampson
DD-383 USS Warrington

Gridley Class
DD-380 USS Gridley
DD-382 USS Craven
DD-400 USS McCall
DD-401 USS Maury