Information

Wiseman DE-667 - History


Wiseman

(DE-667: dp. 1,400; 1. 306', b. 36'10", dr. 9'6" (mean), s. 24 k.; cpl. 186, a. 3 3", 4 1.1", 8 20mm. 2 dct., 8 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.); cl. Buckley)

Wiseman (DE-667) was laid down on 26 July 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp., launched on 6 November 1943; sponsored by Mrs. June Holton, the widow of Lt. (jg.) Wiseman; and commissioned at Algiers, La., on 4 April 1944, Lt. W. B. McClaran, Jr., USNR, in command.

Following shakedown in the Bermuda area and postshakedown availability in the Boston Navy Yard, Wiseman departed Boston on 24 May 1944 on the first of three round-trip convoy escort missions that she conducted through the autumn of 1944. Subsequently converted to a floating power stationthe necessity for ship-to-shore electrical facilities having been proved during earlier phases of the Pacific warat the Charleston (S.C.) Navy Yard, Wiseman sailed for the Pacific on 11 January 1945.

Making port at Pearl Harbor on 3 February, the destroyer escort operated for a month in the Hawaiian Islands before setting sail for the Philippines on 3 March. Arriving at Manila on the 23d, Wiseman commenced furnishing power to that nearly demolished city on 13 April and, over the next five and one-half months, provided some 5,806,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity.

In addition, Wiseman's evaporators furnished 150,000 gallons of drinking water to Army facilities in the harbor area and to many small craft. Her radios were also utilized to a great extent. Placed at the disposal of the Navy's port director, the ship's communication outfit was used to handle harbor radio traffic until the director's equipment arrived and was installed ashore.

Following her vital service at Manila, Wiseman shifted to Guam, where she provided power for the Army dredge Harris (YM-25) for a period of two months. She then returned to the United States and was decommissioned at San Diego on 31 May 1944. She was inactivated there on 31 January 1947.

Recommissioned in the autumn of 1950, after the onset of the Korean War that June, Wisemanunder the command of Lt. Comdr. Jay W. Landrushed to Korea, reaching the port of Mason, near the mouth of the Naktong Biver, at the western anchor-point of the former beachhead at Pusan. As she had done at Manila in 1945, Wiseman now supplied electricity to a city unable to generate its own. Later, the ship provided comforts-of-home to units of the 1st Marine Division quartered on the nearby pier providing hot showers, cigarettes, and hot meals cooked in the ship's galley. The destroyer escort also provided instruction in seamanship, gunnery, radar, sonar, and damage control to 80 midshipmen from the Republic of Korea (ROK) Naval Academy and 120 ROK Navy enlisted men.

Late in 1951, Wiseman returned to the United States and underwent an extensive overhaul at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, Calif., before she conducted refresher training out of San Diego through the spring and summer of 1952. The ship then sailed again for Korean waters, reaching the combat zone that autumn.

In her second Western Pacific (WestPac) deployment since recommissioning, Wiseman screened light carrier task forces off the west coast of Korea; carried out patrol assignments close inshore; blockaded and bombarded segments of the northeastern Korean coast, and provided antisubmarine screen and escort services for replenishment groups. Later in the deployment, she also participated in hunter-killer operations, trained in antisubmarine warfare (ASW) evolutions and served as division flagship during a goodwill call at Manila.

Over the next few years, Wiseman conducted four more WestPac deployments and spent the interludes between them in training out of San Diego and upkeep at Mare Island Naval Shipyard or the San Francisco Naval Shipyard. Upon occasion, she conducted Naval

Reserve training cruisesone taking her to the Hawaiian Islands. During the overseas deployments Wiseman operated with units of SEATO navies Australian, New Zealand, British, Philippine, Pakistani, and Thaiand visited ports from Australia to Japan. Upon completion of her sixth deployment, Wiseman was designated as a Group I Naval Reserve Training (NRT) ship. Accordingly, on 16 May 1959, the ship was decommissioned and turned over to the 11th Naval District. Lt. V. Powell was the first officer-incharge.

For the next two years, Wiseman operated out of San Diego on NRT duties. Every third weekend of the month, a reserve cruise took her to sea for periods of ASW training, and, during the summers, the destroyer escort made two-week reserve cruises.

However, in 1961, the Berlin crisis changed the veteran destroy escort's routine after the building of the Berlin Wall heightened tensions in August of that year. President John F. Kennedy ordered the activation of reserve unitsincluding the Selected Reserve Crew and NRT ships. Recommissioned on 2 October 1961, Lt. C. Wilhoite, Jr., in command, Wiseman was immediately prepared for duty with the 7th Fleet. Since the repair and overhaul facilities at San Diego were overworked Wiseman was overhauled at Long Beach, spending tee pre-Christmas holidays in the Bethlehem shipyards there.

Deploying to WestPac again in January of 1962, Wiseman conducted patrol operations off the coast of the troubled country of Vietnam. She received a "well done" for her performance of duty and in March won commendation for giving medical aid to a fisherman with an infected leg on board a South Vietnamese fishing junk. Later that spring, the ship also visited Hong Kong, Subic Bay, and Japanese portsincluding Yokohama, where she hosted celebrations for Armed Forces Day on 19 and 20 May.

Returning to San Diego on 17 July, via Midway and Pearl Harbor, Wiseman was decommissioned and placed in service on 1 August, resuming her duties as NRT ship with the Group II Naval Reserve. Before the end of 1962, the ship was assigned to Reserve Destroyer Division 272 of Reserve Destroyer Squadron 27.

Placed in reserve but remaining in service, Wisemn~ was berthed at San Diego through the remainder of the 1960's as part of the Pacific Fleet's reserve units. Struck from the Navy list on 15 April 1973, the veteran of World War II and Korean service was subsequently scrapped.

Wiseman (DE-667) received six battle stars for her Korean War service.


Wiseman DE-667 - History

Osborne Beeman Wiseman-born on 20 February 1916 in Zanesville, Ohio-was appointed to the Naval Academy on 22 June 1934, and graduated on 2 June 1938. After sea duty in Saratoga (CV-3) and Roe (DD-418), Wiseman was transferred to the Naval Air Station at Pensacola Fla., for flight training. Detached on 17 March 1941, having won his wings, Wiseman joined Bombing Squadron (VB) 3, embarked in Saratoga .

After that carrier was torpedoed by the Japanese submarine I-25 off Oahu on 11 January 1942 and sent to the Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Wash., for repairs and alterations, her aviation units were transferred ashore to operate from Ford Island. When Yorktown ( CV-5 ) returned to Pearl Harbor for repair of the damage sustained early in May at the Battle of the Coral Sea, her units were transferred from the ship and replaced by some of Saratoga's old units-Bombing Squadron 3, Torpedo Squadron 3, and Fighting Squadron 3. Wiseman reported on board Yorktown in time to take part in the pivotal Battle of Midway.

On the first day of the carrier action, 4 June, Lt. (jg.) Wiseman flew two sorties-one against the carrier Soryu that morning and one against Hiryu that afternoon. The latter, by that point, was the last of the four enemy flattops afloat, and the strike in which Wiseman participated proved to be the coup de grace administered to that ship. Japanese "Zero" fighters, however, swarmed over the Dauntlesses of VB-3 and VB-6, exacting some measure of revenge for the pounding administered to Hiryu . In that melee, Wiseman's plane was shot down. Neither he nor his gunner were seen again.

Having played a major part in turning the tide of the war in the Pacific, Lt. (jg.) Wiseman was awarded the Navy Cross, posthumously, for his heroism and devotion to duty.

(DE-667: dp. 1,400 l. 306' b. 36'10" dr. 9'5" (mean) s. 24 k. cpl. 186 a. 3 3", 4 1.1", 8 20mm.,

2 dct., 8 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.) cl. Buckley )

Wiseman (DE-667) was laid down on 26 July 1943 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 6 November 1943 sponsored by Mrs. June Holton, the widow of Lt. (jg.) Wiseman and commissioned at Algiers, La., on 4 April 1944, Lt. W. B. McClaran, Jr., USNR, in command.

Following shakedown in the Bermuda area and post-shakedown availability in the Boston Navy Yard, Wiseman departed Boston on 24 May 1944 on the first of three round-trip convoy escort missions that she conducted through the autumn of 1944. Subsequently converted to a floating power station-the necessity for ship-to-shore electrical facilities having been proved during earlier phases of the Pacific war-at the Charleston (S.C.) Navy Yard, Wiseman sailed for the Pacific on 11 January 1945.

Making port at Pearl Harbor on 3 February, the destroyer escort operated for a month in the Hawaiian Islands before setting sail for the Philippines on 3 March. Arriving at Manila on the 23d, Wiseman commenced furnishing power to that nearly demolished city on 13 April and, over the next five and one-half months, provided some 5,806,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity.

In addition, Wiseman's evaporators furnished 150,000 gallons of drinking water to Army facilities in the harbor area and to many small craft. Her radios were also utilized to a great extent. Placed at the disposal of the Navy's port director, the ship's communication outfit was used to handle harbor radio traffic until the director's equipment arrived and was installed ashore.

Following her vital service at Manila, Wiseman shifted to Guam, where she provided power for the Army dredge Harris (YM-25) for a period of two months. She then returned to the United States and was decommissioned at San Diego on 31 May 1946. She was inactivated there on 31 January 1947.

Recommissioned in the autumn of 1950, after the onset of the Korean War that June, Wiseman- under the command of Lt. Comdr. Jay W. Land-rushed to Korea, reaching the port of Mason, near the mouth of the Naktong River, at the western anchor-point of the former beachhead at Pusan. As she had done at Manila in 1945, Wiseman now supplied electricity to a city unable to generate its own. Later, the ship provided comforts-of-home to units of the 1st Marine Division quartered on the nearby pier, providing hot showers, cigarettes, and hot meals cooked in the ship's galley. The destroyer escort also provided instruction in seamanship, gunnery, radar, sonar, and damage control to 80 midshipmen from the Republic of Korea (ROK) Naval Academy and 120 ROK Navy enlisted men.

Late in 1951, Wiseman returned to the United States and underwent an extensive overhaul at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard Vallejo, Calif., before she conducted refresher training out of San Diego through the spring and summer of 1952. The ship then sailed again for Korean waters, reaching the combat zone that autumn.

In her second Western Pacific (WestPac) deployment since recommissioning, Wiseman screened light carrier task forces off the west coast of Korea carried out patrol assignments close inshore blockaded and bombarded segments of the northeastern Korean coast, and provided antisubmarine screen and escort services for replenishment groups. Later in the deployment, she also participated in hunter-killer operations, trained in antisubmarine warfare (ASW) evolutions, and served as division flagship during a goodwill call at Manila.

Over the next few years, Wiseman conducted four more WestPac deployments and spent the interludes between them in training out of San Diego and upkeep at Mare Island Naval Shipyard or the San Francisco Naval Shipyard. Upon occasion, she conducted Naval Reserve training cruises-one taking her to the Hawaiian Islands. During the overseas deployments, Wiseman operated with units of SEATO navies-Australian, New Zealand, British, Philippine, Pakistani, and Thai-and visited ports from Australia to Japan. Upon completion of her sixth deployment, Wiseman was designated as a Group I Naval Reserve Training (NRT) ship. Accordingly, on 16 May 1959, the ship was decommissioned and turned over to the 11th Naval District. Lt. W. V. Powell was the first officer-in-charge.

For the next two years, Wiseman operated out of San Diego on NRT duties. Every third weekend of the month, a reserve cruise took her to sea for periods of ASW training and, during the summers, the destroyer escort made two-week reserve cruises.

However, in 1961, the Berlin crisis changed the veteran destroy escort's routine after the building of the Berlin Wall heightened tensions in August of that year. President John F. Kennedy ordered the activation of reserve units-including the Selected Reserve Crew and NRT ships. Recommissioned on 2 October 1961, Lt. Comdr. C. V. Wilhoite, Jr., in command, Wiseman was immediately prepared for duty with the 7th Fleet. Since the repair and overhaul facilities at San Diego were overworked, Wiseman was overhauled at Long Beach, spending the pre-Christmas holidays in the Bethlehem shipyards there.

Deploying to WestPac again in January of 1962, Wiseman conducted patrol operations off the coast of the troubled country of Vietnam. She received a "well done" for her performance of duty and in March won commendation for giving medical aid to a fisherman with an infected leg on board a South Vietnamese fishing junk. Later that spring, the ship also visited Hong Kong, Subic Bay, and Japanese ports-including Yokohama, where she hosted celebrations for Armed Forces Day on 19 and 20 May.

Returning to San Diego on 17 July, via Midway and Pearl Harbor, Wiseman was decommissioned and placed in service on 1 August, resuming her duties as NRT ship with the Group II Naval Reserve. Before the end of 1962, the ship was assigned to Reserve Destroyer Division 272 of Reserve Destroyer Squadron 27.

Placed in reserve but remaining in service, Wiseman was berthed at San Diego through the remainder of the 1960's as part of the Pacific Fleet's reserve units. Struck from the Navy list on 15 April 1973, the veteran of World War II and Korean service was subsequently scrapped.


Contents

Following shakedown in the Bermuda area and post-shakedown availability in the Boston Navy Yard, Wiseman departed Boston on 24 May 1944 to rendezvous with Task Force 64 (TF㻀) and convoy UGS-43 on the first of three round-trip convoy escort runs. She escorted convoy GUS-43 from Casablanca, French Morocco, to New York, then left Hampton Roads with TF-64 and convoy UGS-50 on 3 August, shepherding convoy GUS-50 from Bizerte to the United States, sailing eastward on 29 August. Following repairs and alterations at Boston (19 September – 5 October), Wiseman conducted work-ups in the waters of Casco Bay, Maine, before resuming convoy escort work as part of TF-64, shepherding UGS-57 from Hampton Roads to Bizerte, returning eastward with TF-64 and GUS-57 passing Gibraltar on 11 November, the ship returned to Chesapeake Bay with that portion of GUS-57 on 30 November, before proceeding to Charleston, South Carolina

Subsequently converted to a floating power station — the necessity for ship-to-shore electrical facilities haying been proved during the Pacific war — at the Charleston Navy Yard, Wiseman sailed for the Pacific on 11 January 1945. Reporting to Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet, for duty on 17 January 1945 upon transiting the Panama Canal, she set course for the Hawaiian Islands in company with the high speed transport USS Reeves (APD-52).

Making port at Pearl Harbor on 3 February, the destroyer escort operated for a month in the Hawaiian Islands before setting sail for the Philippines on 3 March. Arriving at Manila on the 23d, she commenced furnishing power to that nearly demolished city on 13 April and, over the next five and one-half months, provided some 5,806,000 kilowatt-hours (20,900 GJ) of electricity. In addition, Wiseman's evaporators furnished 150,000 gallons (570 m³) of drinking water to Army facilities in the harbor area and to many small craft. Her radios were also utilized to a great extent. Placed at the disposal of the Navy's port director, the ship's communication outfit was used to handle harbor radio traffic until the director's equipment arrived and was installed ashore.

Following her vital service at Manila and projected operations at Ketchikan, Alaska, shelved, Wiseman shifted to Guam, arriving on 18 December 1945, where she provided power for the Army dredge Harris (YM-25). Departing Guam on 26 March 1946, in company with sister ship USS Whitehurst (DE-634), she paused at Eniwetok, in the Marshalls (28–29 March), then returned to the United States via Pearl Harbor (4–6 April 1946). Decommissioned at San Diego, California on 31 May 1946, Wiseman was placed in inactivated status on 19 December 1946, then out of commission, in reserve, on 3 February 1947, and moved to Long Beach. Subsequently, the auxiliary ocean tug USS Koka (ATA-185) towed Wiseman from Long Beach back to San Diego (16–17 November 1948).


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Mục lục

Những chiếc thuộc lớp tàu khu trục hộ tống Buckley có chiều dài chung 306 ft (93 m), mạn tàu rộng 37 ft 1 in (11,30 m) và độ sâu mớn nước khi đầy tải là 11 ft 3 in (3,43 m). Chúng có trọng lượng choán nước tiêu chuẩn 1.400 tấn Anh (1.400 t) và lên đến 1.740 tấn Anh (1.770 t) khi đầy tải. [3] Hệ thống động lực bao gồm hai turbine hơi nước General Electric công suất 13.500 mã lực (10.100 kW), dẫn động hai máy phát điện công suất 9.200 kilôwatt (12.300 hp) để vận hành hai trục chân vịt [4] [5] công suất 12.000 hp (8.900 kW) cho phép đạt được tốc độ tối đa 23 kn (26 mph 43 km/h), và có dự trữ hành trình 6.000 nmi (6.900 dặm 11.000 km) khi di chuyển ở vận tốc đường trường 12 kn (14 mph 22 km/h). [6]

Vũ khí trang bị bao gồm ba pháo 3 in (76 mm)/50 cal trên tháp pháo nòng đơn có thể đối hạm hoặc phòng không, một khẩu đội 1,1 inch/75 caliber bốn nòng và tám pháo phòng không Oerlikon 20 mm. Vũ khí chống ngầm bao gồm một dàn súng cối chống tàu ngầm Hedgehog Mk. 10 (có 24 nòng và mang theo 144 quả đạn) hai đường ray Mk. 9 và tám máy phóng K3 Mk. 6 để thả mìn sâu. [6] [7] Khác biệt đáng kể so với lớp Evarts dẫn trước là chúng có thêm ba ống phóng ngư lôi Mark 15 21 inch (533 mm). Thủy thủ đoàn đầy đủ bao gồm 186 sĩ quan và thủy thủ. [6]

Wiseman được đặt lườn tại xưởng tàu của hãng Dravo Corporation tại Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania vào ngày 26 tháng 7, 1943. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 6 tháng 11, 1943 được đỡ đầu bởi bà June Holton, vợ góa Trung úy Wiseman, và nhập biên chế tại Algiers, New Orleans vào ngày 4 tháng 4, 1944 dưới quyền chỉ huy của Hạm trưởng, Thiếu tá Hải quân William B. McClaran, Jr. [1] [2] [8]

1944 – 1946 Sửa đổi

Sau khi hoàn tất hoạt động chạy thử máy huấn luyện tại khu vực Bermuda và được sửa chữa sau chạy thử máy tại Xưởng hải quân Boston, Wiseman khởi hành từ Boston, Massachusetts vào ngày 24 tháng 5, 1944 cho chuyến hộ tống vận tải khứ hồi đầu tiên vượt Đại Tây Dương. Nó gia nhập Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 64 và hộ tống cho Đoàn tàu UGS-43 đi sang Bắc Phi, rồi tiếp tục hộ tống cho Đoàn tàu GUS-43 trong hành trình quay trở về từ Casablanca, Morocco thuộc Pháp đến New York. [1]

Từ đó cho đến cuối tháng 11, Wiseman còn tiếp tục thực hiện thêm hai chuyến hộ tống vận tải khác sang các cảng Bắc Phi. Con tàu cùng Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 64 rời Hampton Roads vào ngày 3 tháng 8 để hộ tống cho Đoàn tàu UGS-50, rồi từ Bizerte, Tunisia hộ tống cho Đoàn tàu GUS-50 quay trở về vào ngày 29 tháng 8. Sau khi được sửa chữa và cải biến tại Boston từ ngày 19 tháng 9 đến ngày 5 tháng 10, nó thực hành huấn luyện tại khu vực Casco Bay, Maine trước khi tiếp tục cùng Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 64 hộ tống cho Đoàn tàu UGS-57 xuất phát từ Hampton Roads để đi sang Bizerte, và quay trở về cùng Đoàn tàu GUS-57, đi ngang qua Gibraltar vào ngày 11 tháng 11. Nó về đến vịnh Chesapeake cùng một bộ phận của Đoàn tàu GUS-57 vào ngày 30 tháng 11, trước khi tiếp tục đi đến Charleston, South Carolina. [1]

Theo kinh nghiệm có được tại các vùng chiếm đóng phát sinh nhu cầu cung cấp điện năng cho các thành phố mới được giải phóng, Wiseman được cải biến tại Xưởng hải quân Charleston thành một trạm phát điện nổi. Nó lên đường vào ngày 11 tháng 1, 1945 để đi sang khu vực Thái Bình Dương, băng qua kênh đào Panama và trình diện cùng Tư lệnh Hạm đội Thái Bình Dương vào ngày 17 tháng 1, và tiếp tục cùng tàu vận chuyển cao tốc Reeves (APD-52) hướng sang khu vực quần đảo Hawaii. [1]

Đi đến Trân Châu Cảng vào ngày 3 tháng 2, Wiseman hoạt động tại vùng biển phụ cận Oahu trong một tháng, rồi lên đường hướng sang Philippines vào ngày 3 tháng 3. Đi đến Manila vào ngày 23 tháng 3, nó bắt đầu cung cấp điện cho thành phố hầu như bị phá hủy toàn bộ này từ ngày 13 tháng 4. Trong năm tháng rưỡi tiếp theo nó đã sản xuất khoảng 5.806.000 kilôwatt giờ (20.900 GJ) điện, đồng thời máy chưng cất nước của con tàu cũng đã cung cấp 150.000 gal Mỹ (570 m 3 ) nước uống cho các căn cứ Lục quân tại khu vực cảng cùng nhiều tàu bè nhỏ. Thiết bị liên lạc vô tuyến của con tàu cũng hữu ích khi được đặt dưới quyền sử dụng của chỉ huy cảng, được sử dụng để điều hành hoạt động cho đến khi trạm vô tuyến được vận chuyển đến và lắp đặt. [1]

Hoàn thành nhiệm vụ hỗ trợ tại Manila, và kế hoạch hoạt động tại Ketchikan, Alaska bị hủy bỏ do chiến tranh đã kết thúc, Wiseman chuyển đến Guam vào ngày 18 tháng 12, nơi nó cung cấp điện cho chiếc tàu cuốc Harris (YM-25). Rời Guam vào ngày 26 tháng 3, 1946, nó cùng tàu chị em Whitehurst (DE-634) quay trở về Hoa Kỳ sau khi ghé qua Eniwetok thuộc quần đảo Marshall trong các ngày 28 và 29 tháng 3 và Trân Châu Cảng từ ngày 4 đến ngày 6 tháng 4. Nó được cho xuất biên chế tại San Diego, California vào ngày 31 tháng 5, 1946 và đưa về thành phần dự bị vào ngày 3 tháng 2, 1947. [2] Con tàu được chuyển đến Long Beach, California, nhưng lại được chiếc tàu kéo Koka (ATA-185) kéo từ Long Beach quay trở lại San Diego vào ngày 17 tháng 11, 1948. [1]

1950–1961 Sửa đổi

Wiseman được tặng thưởng sáu Ngôi sao Chiến trận do thành tích phục vụ trong Chiến tranh Triều Tiên. [1] [2]


Obituary

Paul Carter Wiseman and Nora C. Dover, both of Zanesville, OH, were married on 28 Aug 1912 in Muskingum county, OH. To them were born two children: Donald D. and Osborne Beeman Wiseman. Nora died suddenly on 10 Nov 1918 of Influenza. Donald and Osborne were raised by their paternal grandmother and their father's sister, Audrey. Paul married his second wife, Margaret Terry, on 30 Nov 1922 in Muskingum county, OH. Paul died less than 2 weeks after son Osborne's wedding. Osborne married June Laverne Smith on 18 Jun 1940 in Annapolis, MD. Their only child, Judith Lee Wiseman, was born 26 April 1942 in Alameda county, CA. She married Gerald F. Farkas on 17 Aug 1963 in Annapolis.

Osborne attended Lash High School in Zanesville from 1928-1932. He received an appointment to the Naval Academy and entered at Annapolis, MD in 1934. After graduation in 1938 Ensign Wiseman reported for sea duty after his graduation to the USS Saratoga (CV-3) until October 1939 when he detached for duty with the new construction USS Roe (DD-418) then in Charleston, SC. He served aboard her until September 1940 when he was ordered to flight training at NAS Pensacola. He completed flight training in May 1941 and was subsequently assigned to Bombing Squadron Three (VB-3) aboard USS Saratoga. He was promoted to Ltjg on 2 Jun 1941. After the Saratoga was torpedoed on 11 Jan 1942 she was sent first to Pearl Harbor where her Air Group squadrons were transferred ashore, and then to the Puget Sound Navy Yard in Bremerton, Washington for repairs. Her air group squadrons operated from Ford Island and were assigned to other units as operations required.

During the 1942 Doolittle raid over Tokyo it was Ltjg Wiseman (attached to VB-6) who flew low over the deck of the U.S.S. Enterprise to drop the weighted note advising that a Japanese picket ship had been spotted, thereby informing the command that the mission might have been compromised. Several months later, on the morning of 4 Jun 1942, Ltjg Wiseman launched with other aircraft from Air Group Three from USS Yorktown (CV-5) to attack the Japanese Striking Force. Their attack on the Soryu rendered the carrier a flaming hulk. While their squadron was returning to Yorktown the SBDs found her under attack by Japanese aircraft from the Hiryu. Unable to land on Yorktown most of the returning SBDs of VB-3 had to land on Enterprise (CV-6). Rearmed and refueled, the bombing group, unofficially called "bombing 63*," launched from Enterprise to attack Hiryu. It was during this successful attack that Ltjg Wiseman and his gunner, ARM3 Grant Ulysses Dawn, were killed in action when their plane was shot down by enemy aircraft.

"*Bombing 63" is a combination signifying Bombing Six and Bombing Three. bio compiled by G47

His wife was listed as next of kin.


Wiseman DE-667 - History

History has been a passion of mine since I discovered how much we do know about the past. I particularly remember being astonished to find out, in my early teens, that the barbarian invasion of the Roman Empire was not a time of complete chaos with no historical record, but rather that we know pretty well what happened and when. Despite enjoying and doing well in history in junior school (age 15) I did not continue it in senior, opting for science subjects instead. I don't regret this, because I think history is more accessible to an interested amateur than is science.

    The transition from Roman Britain to early-mediaeval England and Wales is, to me, one of the most fascinating periods in history. The struggle and ultimate failure of one society to defend itself against decline and replacement by another is bound to be interesting. It is of course the time of the real "King Arthur", if there ever was such a person. It has become a hobby for me to try to reconstruct the history of the 5th and 6th centuries in Britain. I first put this website up c.1997, and it has been evolving ever since.


Wiseman History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Wiseman comes from the ancient Anglo-Saxon culture of Britain. It was a name for a wise or learned person. Further research revealed that the name is derived from the Old English words wis, meaning wise or knowledgeable, and man, meaning man. [1]

The family could have ultimately been Norman in origin as "Wisman, of Falaise, Normandy, occurs t. William I. (during the reign of William I)" [2]

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Early Origins of the Wiseman family

The surname Wiseman was first found in Essex where they "belonging to the distinguished families of Rivenhall, Northend, Great Baddow, Felstead, etc., and played an important part in the county and frequently served as high sheriffs." [3]

One of the first records of the family was Ranulph Wisman who witnessed a charter of Beatrix de Say, c. 1140, in favour of Waltham Abbey, Essex. Reginald Wisman, of Essex was listed in 1194. [4]

By the 13th century, records of the name were scattered as seen by the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 which listed Roger Wyseinan, Oxfordshire Alan Wysman, Cambridgeshire and John Wysman, Oxfordshire. The Yorkshire Poll Tax Rolls of 1379 listed Johannes Wysman and Petrus Wysman.

Further to the north in Scotland, Wiseman was "an old surname in Angus and Moray. Andrea Wysman witnessed excambion of the lands of Dolays Mychel in 1232, and in the following year attested a confirmation charter by Andrew, bishop of Moray. " [5]

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Early History of the Wiseman family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Wiseman research. Another 235 words (17 lines of text) covering the years 1232, 1296, 1305, 1285, 1393, 1484, 1630, 1656, 1612, 1513, 1629, 1688, 1677, 1685, 1622, 1676, 1643, 1632, 1712, 1661 and 1679 are included under the topic Early Wiseman History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Wiseman Spelling Variations

Only recently has spelling become standardized in the English language. As the English language evolved in the Middle Ages, the spelling of names changed also. The name Wiseman has undergone many spelling variations, including Wiseman, Wyseman, Wysman, Wisman and others.

Early Notables of the Wiseman family (pre 1700)

Notables of this surname at this time include: Sir Simon Wyssman, knighted in 1513 by King Henry 8th as a result of Sir John's bravery in action at the Battle of Spurs in the Hundred Years War Sir Thomas Wiseman of Rivenhall, Essex and his son, Sir William Wiseman, 1st Baronet (c.1629-1688), an.
Another 52 words (4 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Wiseman Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Wiseman family to Ireland

Some of the Wiseman family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt. More information about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Wiseman migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Wiseman Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Henry Wiseman, who landed in Maryland in 1633 [6]
  • Henry and Catherine Wiseman, who settled in Maryland in 1634
  • Katherin Wiseman, aged 19, who landed in Virginia in 1635 [6]
  • John Wiseman, who settled in Virginia in 1652
  • Thomas Wiseman, who landed in Maryland in 1652-1659 [6]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Wiseman Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Henry Wiseman, who settled in Maryland in 1719
  • Hugh Wiseman, who arrived in Charles Town, South Carolina, along with Margaret, Mary and Robert, in 1767
  • Philipina Wiseman, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1797 [6]
  • Wirnart Wiseman, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1797 [6]
  • Devenport Wiseman, who arrived in Mississippi in 1798 [6]
Wiseman Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • John Wiseman, aged 47, who landed in Vermont in 1812 [6]
  • Timothy Wiseman, aged 38, who arrived in Delaware in 1812 [6]
  • Maria Wiseman, who landed in New York, NY in 1840 [6]
  • Samuel M Wiseman, who arrived in New York, NY in 1840 [6]
  • Maier Wiseman, who arrived in New York in 1842 [6]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Wiseman Settlers in United States in the 20th Century
  • Max Wiseman, aged 21, who arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Cedric" from Liverpool, England[7]
  • Edward Wiseman, originally from Liverpool, who arrived in New York, New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Lapland" from Liverpool, England[8]
  • J. Wiseman, aged 48, originally from St. John's, Nfld, who arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Wellington" from St. John's, Newfoundland [9]
  • Gavin Wiseman, aged 24, originally from Dauville, Kent, who arrived in New York City, New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Rochambeau" from Le Havre, France [10]
  • George Wiseman, aged 19, originally from Aberdeen, Scotland, who arrived in New York in 1919 aboard the ship "Caronia" from Liverpool, England[11]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Wiseman migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Wiseman Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • John Wiseman, who settled in Trinity Bay, Newfoundland, in 1774 [12]
  • Mr. John Lockhart Wiseman U.E. who settled in Shefford Township, Eastern Townships [La Haute-Yamaska Regional County Municipality], Quebec c. 1784 he was an associate of Capt. John Savage [13]
  • Peter Wiseman, who settled in St. John's, Newfoundland, in 1797 [12]

Wiseman migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Wiseman Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • John Wiseman, a harness-maker, who arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832
  • Mrs. Harriet Wiseman, English convict who was convicted in York, Yorkshire, England for 10 years, transported aboard the "Cadet" on 10th November 1848, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [14]
  • Miss Elizabeth Wiseman, (b. 1835), aged 13, English settler traveling with Elizabeth Wiseman convict, transported aboard the "Cadet" on 10th November 1848, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [14]
  • Mr. Miles Wiseman, (b. 1839), aged 9, English settler traveling with Elizabeth Wiseman convict, transported aboard the "Cadet" on 10th November 1848, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [14]
  • Harriet Wiseman, aged 18, who arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "Lysander" in 1851 [15]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Wiseman migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:


Wiseman DE-667 - History


USS Whitehurst Logo by: Pat Stephens, Webmaster, DESA

Now in certain ports, a nice pier side stay would be heaven, but in Pusan, Korea it was pure hell. To get to the city from our berth we had to walk through an area of sunken concrete curing pits containing "night soil." Tank trucks (honey dippers) toured the city picking up human waste, and opened a valve on the rear of the truck to fill the pits. After curing for a period of time, it was removed and used for fertilizer. When the wind was blowing off the land we were almost asphyxiated. This duty was like living in the head. We would eat our meals holding our noses, as frankly the smell permeated everything.
When we complained up the chain of command, the skipper contacted the Division Doctor who visited our ship. He gave an all hands talk, and rewarded us with the knowledge that, "You can't catch any disease from smell." Many of the crew including myself had come down with dysentery. This is an intestinal inflammation, with severe abdominal pain, frequent and intense diarrhea, and you don't really want to hear the rest. When hit with this illness the only relief was to lie in the bunk in a fetal position. Pulling your knees up to the chest seemed to reduce the pain somewhat. I can't remember if we were medicated for this or not. Perhaps it just had to run its course.

These are the conditions we had to work, eat and sleep under.
The doctors informed us that we were getting dysentery from the dust blowing off the land which we were breathing. Flies walking on the ground would deposit the dysentery bugs and the airborne dust would reach our ship. We had to put double layers of cheesecloth over all the ventilators that sucked air to below deck spaces. We were told never to touch our hands to our faces except after washing., Doing this did cut down the dysentery.

Most men had to make only one liberty, before voluntarily confining themselves to the ship, and club house. Other men hearing of conditions in town never made a liberty. We were told not to eat any food, as it was grown in night soil and probably contaminated, and some of the liquor was lethal, made with wood alcohol
Now to keep the entire crew from going "ape," a recreation program was started, and everyone was encouraged to get involved in as many activities as possible. Most of this took place in a club house that was erected on the pier just across from the ship. The building was about 20 x 40 feet, and made of solid Philippine mahogany. It was used for boxing instructions in the afternoon, and bingo, card playing, and board games in the evening.
At the time I was 25 years-old, 6' 2" tall and weighed 225. I had done a little boxing a few years earlier in WWII. QM3 Roy Bilck had been quite a boxer before joining the Navy, and he offered to teach boxing. I being a slugger, thought I could gain a little finesse so I went to a session for instruction. I sparred a little with Bilck, while he analyzed my style, then he told me to lay one on his chin. I refused saying, "I don't want to hurt you." His reply was,
"Go ahead, throw your best punch. You won't be able to touch me." Well he was fast, and he weaved and bobbed and was ducking my punches. In short order, I faked a left, and broke his nose with a follow-up right. To this day, I'm not sure who learned a lesson.

We were rationed to two cans of beer per day, and were issued tickets each good for one can of beer. The beer had to be consumed in the club house on the pier, no alcoholic beverages being allowed aboard a Navy ship. The real beer drinkers would either purchase the tickets from a nondrinker, or give their tickets to a shipmate so that they would go a few days without any beer, and end up on the third day with six cans, etc. This way we had some rip roaring bingo games. The whole object here was to keep the crew from going "ape."

The one man on the ship who could not let his hair down and get in the swing of things, was our Commanding Officer, LCDR Malcolm G. Evans. Being the skipper, and above mixing with the enlisted crew, he kept pretty much to his cabin. What mixing he did was of course with the other officers. A recent phone call with our XO Art Hammarlund, tells me that they played cards in the wardroom almost every evening, except Evans would not play on Sunday. Another officer interviewed for this article tells me that Evans was not above cheating at cards, just a little.

The monotonous duty must have got to the skipper, as it did to many of the crew. One day he went ashore and when he returned he was proceeded up the brow by a little hippety-hop Korean rabbit. All who saw the rabbit hop aboard thought he was the most, and a big fuss was made over him. This is what we lacked, a mascot. The skipper immediately named the rabbit after our executive officer LT Hammarlund. And there were no bones made by the skipper as to whom the rabbit was named after. The X.O. didn't exactly like this, but he never complained. He would just sort of wince when anyone called the rabbit Archie.
The captain had a carpenter get an orange crate, and it was used to make a cage for Archie. The crate was turned upside down and kept under the motor whale boat. The stewards were assigned to feed and water the rabbit daily.
Several times a day, when the bulkheads began to close in on our skipper, he would meander down to the boat deck and let Archie out to hippety-hop around the boat deck. The sad fact began to dawn on the crew, when we realized that when rabbits hop around they usually leave little balls behind, which serves to remind people that they were there. When the rabbit was returned to his cage, a Seaman would be called to clean up after Archie. The first day, the first Seaman was called on to clean rabbit dung, there was an ominous note of foreboding in the air.
Storm clouds were brewing!

Words like mutiny, and insurrection were being bantered about.
Somewhere in the dark recesses deep within the bowels of the Whitehurst a sinister plot was being formed. A crisis had developed. Honorable, Navy Seamen were being called on to perform chores so far beyond the call of duty, that a medal had not as yet been struck for this unheard of sacrifice.
Angry voices were mumbling suggestions. A midnight swim call for all rabbits aboard the Whitehurst someone suggested. Another proposed a night rabbit launch, substituting a seaman's strong right arm, for a steam cat. How about rabbit stew, a chow hound piped up. We could use a number 10 can, and the hot plate in the Boatswain's locker. Some sex fiend suggested we catch a female rabbit, and using her to lure Archie into going AWOL. Only trouble here, was no one knew how to tell a male rabbit from a female rabbit, and we ran the risk of having two Archies. These ideas are pure conjecture on my part, as I was not present at this clandestine affair but we know for certain that a decision was reached. LAUNCH ONE RABBIT!

We can only speculate as to just what happened next, or which of our honorable shipmates were involved (no one has ever confessed) but its not too hard to imagine a couple of shadowy figures slipping quietly forward on the boat deck around midnight, towards one unsuspecting Korean rabbit. The launch was made without any frivolous advance preparation. This launch required no steam cat, no Catapult Officer, no engine warm-up, no heading the ship into the wind. Merely the slow lifting of one orange crate, and a secure hold on two long ears, then swoosh, Archie was airborne in an arc calculated to clear the port side at a respectable altitude. This to give our launch crew time to slither away undetected before the splash in Pusan harbor, alerted the bow and fantail sentries that anything was amiss.

The topic of conversation at breakfast the next morning was whether or not a rabbit could swim. When the skipper was informed that his rabbit was missing, he thundered, "I'm going to get me another rabbit, and post a 24 hour guard on him." Apparently cooler heads prevailed, and the skipper was advised, that guard or no guard, any rabbit pulling duty on the Whitehurst had a limited future.

Archie was a three day veteran, of the Korean conflict. The war diary for this date carried the entry Scratch one Korean rabbit, Archie by name. R.I.P. The only rabbit the Navy lost in Korea.

Addendum by Al Crawford, Oct, 2002:

I've been talking by phone with Hugh Toney, and he called me today. We talked about a lot of things, and like a bolt out of the blue, I thought about something I had never thought of before.
I always assumed the rabbit was tossed over the side by some seaman who was angry about cleaning up those little poop balls. Tonight it dawned on me. Not true, cleaning up that stuff would have been no big deal for a seaman. The rabbit went over the side because the crew hated Evans. We could not throw him over the side, so the poor rabbit was the only way anyone could get to Evans. And that is why I believe he was tossed.


ABOUT HULLNUMBER.COM


HullNumber.com started with the passing of my best Navy buddy in August 1999 at the age of 40. He lived four hours away and I visited him every second or third year for the nearly twenty years since we served together. I attended his funeral and had several of my Navy pictures reprinted for his friends and family. My shipmate was a true friend of mine.
The passing of my shipmate spurred me to search the Internet for Navy sites. I found an unexpected number of sites dedicated to ships, units and the military.

HullNumber.com exists because of the sacrifice and effort that we all made to enable our ships to make their commitments. In the past twenty years, I've routinely told my friends of crossing the Atlantic. That we knew we were getting close to the other side when a Russian Tupulov Bear bomber, with a red star on its tail, would fly by.

click on image to view larger version
Soviet Bear Bomber
The Russian Bear and the Red Star . it seems unimaginable from today . but today exists the way it does because millions of U.S. Military personnel worked and sacrificed to enable their unit to make its commitments.


I wish you smooth sailing.


Dave Schultz
ex - USS Newport (LST-1179)
R Div. 1977-80
December 1999


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