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Black Death - 2011 Film
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Black Death - 2011 Film

Released directly on DVD on April 1, 2011 without going through the cinema box in France, Black Death (in French: Peste Noire) directed by Christopher Smith (Creep, Severance) is reminiscent of The Last of the Templars, projected on our screens in January of the same year: a story of a witch-hunt in an England plagued by the terrifying Black Death.

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The Struggle for the Frontier States: Kentucky

Of all the states that strived to stay out of the Civil War, Kentucky was the one that did so the longest. Its temporary neutrality was essentially the result of a political compromise within its own institutions, between the supporters of the Union, on the one hand, lined up behind the eminent Senator John Crittenden (the same one who had tried to avoid the war by submitting to the Senate a compromise protecting slavery), and on the other hand those of secession, which included among them the governor of the State, Beriah Magoffin.
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Atlas of missing places and remains of the world

Who does not dream of discovering a lost city? Who doesn't feel a certain melancholy in front of vestiges of a past civilization? How not to shudder at the fragility of our planet in the face of ongoing climate change? With his Atlas of Missing Places (Editions de La Martinière), the American writer and journalist Travis Elborough invites us to explore the remains of the world.
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Pre-Columbian Civilizations: America before Columbus

The story of the “discovery” of the Americas by Christopher Columbus and his successors, who quickly became conquerors, is well known. This is less the case with the situation of the continent on the eve of this conquest, with the exception of the Aztecs and the Incas, because they are empires which come into conflict with the Europeans upon their arrival.
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Battle of Kursk (July-August 1943)

Within the historiography of the German-Soviet side of the Second World War, the Battle of Kursk occupies a unique place. A gigantic material battle, marked by an armor clash of unprecedented magnitude, it represents one of those turning points of World War II.
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Monuments to the dead: places of memory

There is an old misunderstanding as to the true meaning of war memorials. These places of remembrance which welcome men decked out with decorations, tricolor flags, singing La Marseillaise, cast doubt on the true interpretation that should be given to these monuments.
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Ephemeris of November 12

Dear reader, dear reader. The survival of our site depends entirely on advertising revenue, to support us and continue to enjoy the services offered by our team of volunteers in the future, please deactivate your ad blocker for the site https: // www. story-for-all.
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The Frankish Crusades of Spain (R. de Beaumont)

The crusades in the East continue to produce a quantity of works of scholars or more general public, of sometimes questionable quality and interest. On the other hand, what happened at the same time in Spain, and even more what came before, is more rarely discussed, with the exception of the story of an often fantasized or caricatured Al Andalus.
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Ash Wednesday and Lent

Succeeding Mardi Gras, Ash Wednesday has been one of the highlights of the liturgical calendar of the Catholic Church since the 6th century. Ash Wednesday marks the entry of believers into a period of fasting that has been perpetuated since the 4th century, Lent, which must prepare them for the greatest feast of Christendom, the one which celebrates the resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth: Easter.
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The discovery of petroleum (1859)

The discovery of oil dates back to ancient times. The Egyptians also used petroleum for mummification, the Mesopotamians as a cosmetic and fuel for lighting. The oil industry officially came into being one day in the summer of 1859 when engineer Edwin Drake, a former railroad employee who claimed to be a colonel, saw oil spurting out of his Titus-town borehole, in Pennsylvania.
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History of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire

There are books that have a lasting impact on men. Rousseau's Du Contrat Social is an example of these. Edward Gibbon's History of the Decay and Fall of the Roman Empire is one of them. This monumental sum published between 1776 and 1788-1789 has formed generations of historians and politicians.
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The Iliad and the Odyssey: Homer's World

The Iliad and the Odyssey are considered to be masterpieces of ancient Greece, the first in Western literature. These are two epics attributed to a Greek poet named “Homer (in ancient Greek Ὅμηρος, Hómêros, hostage)”. The Greeks did not doubt of its existence. It was said that he was born in Ionia in Chios or Smyrna around 850 BC.
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River campaign on the Mississippi: 1861 - 1862

Si les rivières Tennessee et Cumberland constituaient autant d’avenues pour une pénétration fédérale au cœur du territoire sudiste, la vallée du Mississippi était encore plus importante stratégiquement. Entre des mains nordistes, elle couperait la Confédération en deux, privant ses armées des ressources agricoles – notamment en bétail et en chevaux – de la partie occidentale du pays, Louisiane, Arkansas et Texas.
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Television - History and Invention

The invention of Television is the culmination of a long journey of discoveries and inventions made since the end of the 19th century. January 26, 1926 saw the first public broadcast of television footage by Scotsman John Baird. Confidential and for a long time in black and white, TV then experienced a dazzling development from the 1950s, gaining color and inviting itself into most homes.
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History of motor racing

Until the end of the Formula 1 World Championship season, the premier event in motorsport, the enthusiasm of spectators who have the chance to be live and viewers who are content to be in front of their posts, is still the same. But what do we know about these cars? How did they become racing cars?
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The Third Crusade (1189-1192)

It has been almost a century since Urban II launched the Crusade to liberate Jerusalem, when it was reconquered by Saladin in 1187. The Latin States were weakened, the county of Edessa was even destroyed and a previous crusade, however taken by two major rulers of the West, has failed miserably.
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Battle of the Catalan Fields (451)

The Battle of the Catalan Fields was the encounter between two worlds, that of Attila king of the Huns leading his formidable hordes across Western Europe and that of Gallo-Roman Gaul, former territory of the Roman Empire. This decisive fight did not take place near Châlons-en-Champagne as tradition reports, but near Troyes, at the Mauriacus campus.
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Battle of Normandy (June-September 1944)

The Battle of Normandy, which took place from June to September 1944, is a defining battle of World War II. It began on June 6, 1944 with the massive landing of Allied soldiers on the Normandy beaches. Although very deadly on some beaches, the landing was a success.
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Maps and cartography under the Ancien Régime

Nowadays, to go for a walk or to search for a region, we use GPS, internet media or possibly our good old road maps. But what about in the time of the kings Louis XIII, Louis XIV or Louis XV? The first maps of the Renaissance In the 13th century, there were a few drawn maps, but only for sailors in order to find their bearings in relation to the profile of the coastline, in particular that of the Mediterranean, well supplied with ports.
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The chartreuse, the story of a virtuous liquor

On the evening of the Titanic sinking, April 14, 1912, a dessert made from Chartreuse was on the menu for the 1st classes. It was the tenth dish, that of "peaches in jelly of Chartreuse" ... Incredible destiny that that of this liqueur! A mysterious origin It was in 1605 that the monks of the Chartreuse de Vauvert would have received from the Duke of & 39; 39; Estrées, a Marshal of Henry IV, a mysterious manuscript with the formula of an elixir of long life, containing almost all the medicinal plants of the time and of which no one knows the origin.
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The Hartmannswillerkopf battlefield (Vieil Armand)

The Vieil-Armand or Hartmannswillerkopf, is a battlefield of the Great War almost intact. Nicknamed Hartmannswillerkopf by the Germans, this battlefield remains largely unknown because it is obscured by the great names of war, such as Verdun, Artois or Chemin des Dames. However, it played a significant role and it was the scene of some of the deadliest fighting in the war.
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